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Bulletin for the Study of Religion

The Bulletin began life in 1971 as the CSSR Bulletin when it was published by the Council of Societies for the Study of Religion. In 2009 the Council disbanded and the journal moved to Equinox.

Historically the journal has published articles that address religion in general, the history of the field of religious studies, method and theory in the study of religion, and pedagogical practices. From 2010 (volume 39), the Bulletin is published in print and, for the first time, online, with a print frequency of 4 issues per volume.

The online edition includes supplemental content not appearing in the print version including interviews, book excerpts, blogs, and profiles of key thinkers in the study of religion. The new Bulletin also includes open access features and offers enhanced search and access functions across the full range of Equinox books and journals in religious studies, biblical studies, ethics and theology.

Publication Frequency (Print Edition)

Feb, April, September and November

ISSN: 2041-1863 (Print)

ISSN: 2041-1871 (Online)


Editorial Address


Philip Tite
c/o Equinox Publishing Ltd
Office 415, The Workstation
15 Paternoster Row
Sheffield, S1 2BX
UK

Recent Blog Entries

 

NAASR Notes: Adam T. Miller

by Adam T. Miller NAASR Notes is a feature with the Bulletin where we invite members of the North American Association for the Study of Religion to describe books they are reading and/or research and writing projects that will be … Continue reading
Posted: 2015-08-31More...
 

Star Wars and Religion

“May the Force be with you.” “And also with you.” Note: This post originally appear on the Feeling the Force blog. by Kate Daley-Bailey If you were to catch the end of any conversation I have with my family, you … Continue reading
Posted: 2015-08-28More...
 

How to Organize the World Religions Survey (?)

by Charles McCrary Earlier this year, during the spring semester, I wrote a post about my teaching world religions and the possibility of using a tentative definition of “religion.” In the post I briefly considered how the course might look … Continue reading
Posted: 2015-08-26More...
 

Theses on Professionalization: Emily D. Crews

In this series with the Bulletin, we have asked 21 early career scholars to weigh in on Russell McCutcheon’s Theses on Professionalization, first published in 2007. In his 21 theses, McCutcheon offers advice to young scholars entering (or soon to enter) the job … Continue reading
Posted: 2015-08-24More...
 

The Enduring Appeal of the Missionary Position Revisited

by Matt Sheedy In August 2013, I wrote a blog post entitled, “The Enduring Appeal of the Missionary Position: Some Contemporary Representations of Native-Jesuit Relations,” based on a trip that I took to a well-known shrine and museum in the … Continue reading
Posted: 2015-08-21More...
 

Teaching Beyond the World Religions Paradigm?

By Philip L. Tite Currently I am teaching an undergraduate course, Introductions to Western Religions. This introductory course (along with its companion course, Introduction to Eastern Religions) is a common one in universities across North America. These are the basic … Continue reading
Posted: 2015-08-19More...
 

Theses on Professionalization: Barbara Krawcowicz

In this series with the Bulletin, we have asked 21 early career scholars to weigh in on Russell McCutcheon’s Theses on Professionalization, first published in 2007. In his 21 theses, McCutcheon offers advice to young scholars entering (or soon to enter) the job … Continue reading
Posted: 2015-08-17More...
 

Theses on Professionalization: Jeffrey Wheatley

by Jeffrey Wheatley In this series with the Bulletin, we have asked 21 early career scholars to weigh in on Russell McCutcheon’s Theses on Professionalization, first published in 2007. In his 21 theses, McCutcheon offers advice to young scholars entering (or soon to … Continue reading
Posted: 2015-08-14More...
 

Using World Religions

by Steven Ramey Note: This post originally appeared on the Culture on the Edge blog. “World religions” as a way of organizing the world have become the focus of scholarly critiques (including my recent post) that connect this discourse to the interests and … Continue reading
Posted: 2015-08-07More...
 

Science, Religion & Culture: Special Issue on “Atheism, Secularity, and Science”

Announcing the publication of “Atheism, Secularity, and Science,” a special issue of the journal Science, Religion & Culture, guest edited by John R. Shook, Ralph W. Hood Jr., and Thomas J. Coleman III. The journal issue contains theoretical and empirical articles … Continue reading
Posted: 2015-08-05More...
 

Recent Articles

 

Roundtable on Eastern Traditions

The following is a roundtable discussion, where contributors to the panel on "eastern religious traditions" respond to each others work.
Posted: 2015-06-09More...
 

NAASR Notes

NAASR Notes began as feature with the Bulletin for the Study of Religion blog, where we invite members of the North American Association for the Study of Religion to describe books they are reading and/or research and writing projects that will be of interests to scholars in the field. The following are the first five pieces in the series: by Sean Durbin, Jason Blum, Russell McCutcheon, Naomi Goldenberg, and Dennis LoRusso.
Posted: 2015-06-09More...
 

North American Association for the Study of Religion (NAASR): An Interview with Russell McCutcheon

I interviewed Russell McCutcheon back in March 2015, about his new role as president of the North American Association for the Study of Religion (NAASR), asking him about the history of the organization, goals for his tenure, and developments for NAASR’s upcoming conference in Atlanta in November 2015.
Posted: 2015-06-05More...
 

“Weasternization” of the West: Kumbh Mela as a Pilgrimage Place For Spiritual Seekers from the West

This paper will, with reference to fieldwork carried out during the Kumbh Melā 2013, the big pilgrimage among Hindus in India, discuss the impact that the East is having on the West. Cambell has termed this process for: ’The Easternization of the West’ (2007)when Eastern notion s and world views is becoming a part of the West but in a new and changed form. This process of reinterpretation or translation is also the case, when it comes to the understanding of and participation in the Kumbh Melā; especially in relation to understanding the snaan or holy dip in the water on the most auspicious days at Kumbh Melā. This paper will give examples of how this is interpreted or translated in such a way that it suits the Western oriented spiritual seeker or pilgrim in his or her spiritual auto biographical patchwork, constructed by the Western oriented mind.
Posted: 2015-05-11More...
 

The Pedagogical Issues of Teaching "Eastern" and "Western" Traditions

Rather than doing away with the categories of "East" and "West," this article draws attention to and problematizes these classifications as constructed notions of space that are always changing. Theoretical models such as Orientalism and neo-Orientalism help us to critically evaluate these categories and thus make them useful in the classroom.
Posted: 2015-05-11More...
 

Most Viewed Articles

 

Current Trends in the Study of Early Christian Martyrdom

This paper investigate recent scholarship on early Christian martyrdom. It discusses the shift away from the study of the origins of martyrdom to an interest in martyrdom and the body, Christian identity formation, and martyrdom and orthodoxy. It further discusses the need for a reappraisal of the evidence for early Christian martyrdom and the renewed attention that questions of dating, authorship, and provenance have received.
Posted: 2012-08-12More...
 

Reinventing Religious Studies: An Interview with Scott Elliott

I interviewed Scott S. Elliott in December 2013, where we discussed his recent book (as editor) Reinventing Religious Studies: Key Writings in the History of a Discipline (Acumen 2013). Our conversation ranged from the history of the Council of Societies for the Study of Religion to how articles appearing in its journal, the CSSR Bulletin, over some 40-odd years have been at the leading edge of advancing debates in the study of religion, from problems in theory and method and the definition of religion, to issues of identity politics and the study of Islam.
Posted: 2014-03-05More...
 

Religion Snapshots: On the Uses of “Data”

Religion Snapshots is a new feature with the Bulletin for the Study of Religion blog, where a number of contributors are asked to briefly comment on popular news items or pressing theoretical issues in the field, especially those topics relating to definitions, classification and method and theory in the study of religion more generally. Below is one such roundtable discussion, focusing on the problematic notion of “data” in the study of religion. The editors of the Bulletin encourage readers to follow Religion Snapshots on our blog (and, of course, we welcome responses to the topics discussed by other scholars).
Posted: 2014-01-10More...
 

Romania’s Saving Angels: ”New Men”, Orthodoxy and Blood Mysticism in the Legionary Movement

In Romania, a Christian, ultranationalistic movement known as The Legionary Movement has before and after the Communist period called for a national, spritual revolution. Perceiving themselves as front fighters protected by the Archangel, Legionaries endeavour to purify the nation so that it can live in its God-given fatherland. In order to assure national resurrection, Legionaries want to create a “New Man”, understood as a new male. This ideal combines the qualities of a Christian martyr, a working hero, a monk and a militant and as such both complex and ambiguous. In practice, Legionaries have a lot in common with other European “boot boys”. Based on field studies, this article discusses the role of men in this movement: their role models, male bonding, rituals and myths, as well as their concepts of family, brotherhood and blood relations, all with reference to a particular ethnonationalistic, christocentric worldview.
Posted: 2012-03-15More...
 

Queer Pedagogy and/in Religious Studies

An Introduction to the Special Issue of the Bulletin. The essays emerged out of a panel discussion co-sponsored by the “Queer Theory and LGBT Studies Consultation” and the “Teaching Religion Section” at the 2009 Annual Meeting of the American Academy of Religion. Contributors were invited to produce reflections on teaching religion queerly, teaching religion as a queer thing, subverting conventional definitions of (the) discipline, and teaching religion outside of religious studies departments/programs, among other possible topics.
Posted: 2010-08-13More...
 

Announcements

 

Letter from the President, Council of Societies for the Study of Religion

 
Russell T. McCutcheon' s announcement that appeared in the September 2009 issue of the CSSR Bulletin  
Posted: 2009-10-07 More...
 
More Announcements...



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