Latest Issue: Vol 15, No 1-2 (2013) RSS2 logo

Pomegranate: The International Journal of Pagan Studies

Editor
Chas Clifton, Colorado State University-Pueblo

Letters and Review Editor
Christopher Chase
Send Books for Review to Christopher Chase
402 Catt Hall
Department of Philosophy and Religious Studies
Iowa State University
Ames, Iowa 50011-1302

Editor Emeritus
Fritz Muntean, Vancouver

The Pomegranate is the first International, peer-reviewed journal of Pagan studies. It provides a forum for papers, essays and symposia on both ancient and contemporary Pagan religious practices. The Pomegranate also publishes timely reviews of scholarly books in this growing field. The editors seek both new interpretations and re-examinations of those traditions marked both by an emphasis on nature as a source of sacred value (e.g., Wicca, modern Goddess religions) as well as those emphasizing continuity with a polytheistic past (e.g., Ásatrú and other forms of 'reconstructionist' Paganism). The editors also seek papers on the interplay between Pagan religious traditions, popular culture, literature, psychology and the arts.

Indexing and Abstracting
Scopus Abstract and Citation Database
Religious & Theological Abstracts
ISI Web of Knowledge
EBSCO's Academic Search Premier & Religion and Philosophy Collection

Publication and Frequency: May and November
ISSN 1528-0268 (print)
ISSN 1743-1735 (online)

Editor's Blog

 

Satan in Northern Ireland

Dennis Wheatley (1897–1977),  British military intelligence operative and author of occult-horror novels, is supposed to have left the “strategic military deception” trade after World War II, but his spirit evidently lived on. According to a recent article in The Guardian newspaper, during “the Troubles” — the period of conflict between versions of the Irish Republican […]
Posted: 2014-10-17More...
 

The Myth of Halloween Sadism

Myth in the popular sense, that is to say, an urban legend, says sociologist Joel Best, who has been studying the razor-blade-in-the-apple and similar stories for decades. Visit his website and click the tab for “Halloween Sadism.” Halloween sadism is best seen as a contemporary legend (sometimes called an urban legend) (Best and Horiuchi 1985, […]
Posted: 2014-10-16More...
 

Queen Nefertiti Goes Cuckoo

“It’s kind of fascinating but it’s kind of horrifying,” I said to M. across the breakfast table when I saw an ad for “the only cuckoo clock inspired by the Wonders of Ancient Egypt.” “‘Queen Nefertiti’s regal procession rotates,‘ it says,” I added. “Horrifying, completely horrifying,” she replied. She detests noise-making clocks and barely tolerates […]
Posted: 2014-10-12More...
 

Help a Russian Scholar of Paganism Attend the AAR

Most scholars who attend the American Academy of Religion annual meeting have their travel and hotel rooms paid for, at least partly, by their institutions. Some, however, don’t receive such support. Dmitry Galtsin, a researcher in the Rare Books Department of the Library of the Russian Academy of Sciences. Galtsin has had a paper on […]
Posted: 2014-10-11More...
 

Clerical Dress for Respect, Christian and Pagan

It happened this afternoon that I had tabs open to two different articles about clothing and social respect for (Protestant Christian) clergy as well as a Wild Hunt post about some kind of Pagan trying to prank the county commissioners in Escambia County, Florida, into abandoning their custom of religious invocations before meetings. (I am […]
Posted: 2014-10-08More...
 

Where Is Your Nile?

After a living room talk to a group of Anchorage Pagans about different types of nature religion, I ended up in the kitchen with a woman who was an Egyptian reconstructionist — or revivalist, as she preferred to say. Given my concerns, my first thought was that if the ancient Egyptian sacred year was organized […]
Posted: 2014-10-06More...
 

Get Your Jesuses Now . . .

. . . they will be back to the regular pricing during the pre-Christmas shopping season (Camino Real Mexican-import store, El Prado, New Mexico).
Posted: 2014-09-29More...
 

La fiesta de los zombies

What do New Mexico zombies eat? Brain tacos, of course. 2 lbs. brains 6–8 tortillas 1 fresh tomato, sliced 1 small onion, diced, shredded lettuce 1 teaspoon salt 1/4 teaspoon garlic powder salt and pepper to taste Cover brains with water in saucepan, add salt and simmer 15 minutes. Drain well and mash with fork […]
Posted: 2014-09-27More...
 

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