Vol 27 No. 2 (2008)

Articles

Independent Historian
Independent Historian
City University of Los Angeles
City University of Los Angeles
The central concern of this article is family values taught in the religion of southern working-class people in the antebellum United States. It uses a representative South Carolina family and focuses on the values in three different contexts: religion, family and labor. In living out their lives, working people encountered both success and failure. Their history is compared with the present-day family value discussion, as conducted by scholars such as James Dobson.
independent scholar
Maria Beatrice Bittarello was awarded a PhD in Religious Studies from the University of Stirling in 2007. She has published several articles on modern Paganism's re-crafting of ancient classical myths, and on issues of ethnic reoresentation in ancient and contemporary literature.
The paper attempts a theoretical re-appraisal of contemporary Pagan ritual by posing the following question: do Pagan rituals online contradict this new religion’s stress on embodiment or, rather, do such rituals compel us to reconsider and re-evaluate the category of ritual itself? The author examines first the main features of contemporary Pagan ritual offline and online, as they emerge from ethnographic work and from scholarly interpretations, then, based also on a re-evaluation of the relationship between actuality and virtuality in certain works on computer mediated communication, highlights the existence of a close relationship between the creation of symbolic meaning and ritual in contemporary Paganism.
Mount Royal College
Mount Royal College
This paper considers the issue of multiculturalism through an examination of the way Gandhi’s relationship with the West has been understood. This discussion of Gandhi, the West, and multiculturalism proceeds in an historical framework. It begins by offering a short characterization of the way many, though certainly not all, Europeans involved in the colonial project understood their relationship with India and Indians. This provides the necessary context to sketch the postcolonial critic of Europe’s engagement with India, as well as to show how Gandhi actively played upon Western cultural values in his own thinking. The author argues that these two ways, “the colonial and the postcolonial” are insufficient for understanding Gandhi’s views on identity and multiculturalism. Instead, drawing on the work of Amartya Sen, a third option is proposed. This third option casts the concept of multiculturalism and our understanding of Gandhi in a new light.
Trinity Western University
Andrew Perrin is a Research Assistant to the Canada Research Chair in Dead Sea Scrolls Studies at the Dead Sea Scrolls Institute, British Columbia Canada. He is currently receiving funding from the Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council to pursue research on the Reworked Pentateuch materials found among the Scrolls. His research interests and publications lie in the areas of Hebrew Bible, Second Temple history and Dead Sea Scrolls. He holds a BA in Theology from Rocky Mountain College and is completing a MA Biblical Studies at Trinity Western University, British Columbia Canada.
Much scholarly activity has focused on the texts of the Qumran community and their potential parallels to the New Testament, a process over which some care must be taken lest too much be read across from one source to another. Clearly the Scrolls tell us that within the Second Temple era great diversity reigned, making it a difficult task to make simple historical connections. In this article, we will explore two aspects of Jesus’ messianic portrayal by the New Testament authors and then attempt to determine clues from the Scrolls that will aid in formulating a critical theology of Jesus as the Messiah. The study will deal with the explicit claims of Jesus’ divine sonship and the implicit notion of how Jesus’ actions and deeds are indicative of his identity as Israel’s awaited Messiah.
Knox College, Toronto School of Theology
Knox College, Toronto School of Theology
George Grant is well known as a Canadian Political Philosopher and social critic of technological globalization, but less known as a Christian with a highly distinctive and penetrating spirituality. This essay not only argues that Grant’s spirituality fundamentally shapes his thought, but that he unfolded his spirituality through key concepts which Grant discovered in his engagement with the gospels and the writings of Simone Weil.