Genre Pedagogy Across the Curriculum - Theory and Application in U.S. Classrooms and Contexts - Luciana de Oliveira

Genre Pedagogy Across the Curriculum - Theory and Application in U.S. Classrooms and Contexts - Luciana de Oliveira

Tackling a genre: situating SFL genre pedagogy in a new context

Genre Pedagogy Across the Curriculum - Theory and Application in U.S. Classrooms and Contexts - Luciana de Oliveira

Mary Schleppegrell [+-]
University of Michigan
Mary Schleppegrell is Professor of Education at the University of Michigan. She uses systemic functional linguistics to study the linguistic challenges of learning and children’s language development. With literacy scholar Annemarie Palincsar, she led the Language and Meaning project to support bilingual children’s literacy development across subject areas, and is currently collaborating with Chauncey Monte-Sano to study teacher learning to support emergent bilinguals in social studies. She is the author of The Language of Schooling (Erlbaum, 2004), Developing Advanced Literacy in First and Second Languages(with Cecilia Colombi, Erlbaum, 2002,) Reading in Secondary Content Areas (with Zhihui Fang, University of Michigan Press, 2008), and Focus on Grammar and Meaning (with Luciana de Oliveira, Oxford University Press, 2015).
Jason Moore [+-]
University of Michigan
Jason Moore is a postdoctoral research fellow at the University of Michigan’s School of Education and a former high school English teacher. He earned an MA from the University of Virginia. His research explores ways in which a functional approach to language can support English language learners’ disciplinary reading and writing in the English Language Arts.
Shireen Al-Adeimi [+-]
Harvard University
Shireen Al-Adeimi is a doctoral student in Human Development and Education at the Harvard Graduate School of Education. Prior to pursuing her doctoral studies, she taught sixth grade Language Arts and Literature in New Mexico, and subsequently earned an MA in Teaching and Learning at the University of Michigan’s School of Education. She is interested in language and literacy, with a focus on the written development of academic language and bilingual education research.
Catherine L. O'Halloran [+-]
University of Michigan
Catherine L. O’Hallaron is a postdoctoral research fellow at the University of Michigan’s School of Education, where she earned her PhD in Literacy, Language, and Culture. Her research interests include linguistic approaches to studying English learners’ writing development and the use of functional linguistic pedagogy in enhancing teachers’ writing instruction.
Annemarie Sullivan Palincsar [+-]
University of Michigan
Annemarie Sullivan Palincsar is the Jean and Charles Walgreen Jr. Chair of Reading and Literacy, Arthur F. Thurnau Professor, and a teacher educator in Educational Studies at the University of Michigan. Her research focuses on the design of learning environments that support self-regulation in learning activity, especially for children who experience difficulty learning in school. Her book, co-authored with Linda Kucan, Comprehension Instruction through Text-based Discussion, was published in 2013.
Carrie Symons [+-]
Michigan State University
Carrie Symons is Assistant Professor in the Department of Teacher Education at Michigan State University, USA. Her research explores the relationship between classroom teachers’ instructional practices and immigrant-origin youth’s literacy and language development in multilingual contexts. Formerly an elementary classroom teacher of 10 years, Dr. Symons prioritizes the building of long-term, mutualistic, research-practice partnerships with local community organizations, schools, and teachers. In collaboration with these critical partners, she aims to identify what teachers need to know to effectively facilitate immigrant-origin youth’s learning across content areas and how this culturally and linguistically responsive pedagogical knowledge is best developed.

Description

Systemic functional linguistics (SFL) has developed both detailed descriptions of common school genres as well as a theory for genre-based pedagogy. While these have sometimes been critiqued as rigid or static, the work presented here shows the adaptability of the SFL approach in research with primary-grade bilingual students in the U.S. Specifically, we modified a recount genre, common to reporting history and personal experience, in order to support students’ analytical responses to grade-appropriate literature. The paper first describes the features and learning goals of the context and how we presented the genre and supporting pedagogy. It then evaluates the approach, reporting evidence from student writing and classroom implementation to highlight some affordances and challenges that arose. Lastly, the paper identifies some considerations that may guide future work to implement genre-based writing instruction in other contexts in flexible and powerful ways. These include being clear about the purpose of the genre as a whole, writing prompts that support that purpose, and providing support for creating coherence across stages of the genre.

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Citation

Schleppegrell, Mary; Moore, Jason; Al-Adeimi, Shireen ; O'Halloran, Catherine; Palincsar, Annemarie; Symons, Carrie. Tackling a genre: situating SFL genre pedagogy in a new context. Genre Pedagogy Across the Curriculum - Theory and Application in U.S. Classrooms and Contexts. Equinox eBooks Publishing, United Kingdom. p. 25-39 Nov 2014. ISBN 9781845532413. https://www.equinoxpub.com/home/view-chapter/?id=24920. Date accessed: 18 Aug 2022 doi: 10.1558/equinox.24920. Nov 2014

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