Latest Issue: Vol 6, No 3 (2014) RSS2 logo

Writing & Pedagogy

Editor-in-Chief
Martha C. Pennington, SOAS and Birkbeck College, University of London

Associate Editor
Rodney H. Jones, City University of Hong Kong

Research Matters Editor
Miriam Eisenstein Ebsworth, New York University

Reflections on Practice Editor
Theresa M. Welford, Georgia Southern University

e-Sphere Editor
Vance Stevens, CERT, Higher Colleges of Technology

New Books Editor
Rodney Jones
Please send books for review in Writing & Pedagogy to:
Rodney Jones
Department of English
City University of Hong Kong
Creative Media Centre
Cornwall Street
Kowloon Tong, Kowloon
Hong Kong

Writing & Pedagogy seeks to provide a new forum for discussion and dissemination of knowledge focused on both writing and the teaching of writing. It is innovative in being both international in scope and in spanning across all levels of education, from K-12 through doctoral level. The journal aims to provide information and stimulate conversations that can advance the theory and practice of writing pedagogy in first- and second-language environments by revealing similarities and differences in the practices and concerns regarding writing and the teaching of writing across different contexts and educational systems. The journal solicits submissions in the categories of essays, research reports, pedagogical reflections, discussions of technology, and book reviews. Although the primary focus is on the teaching of English writing within formal education, the journal welcomes articles on writing outside of English education, such as the teaching of writing in other languages, the writing needs of specific workplace contexts, and issues of a theoretical or practical nature involving the nature of writing or research on writing.

Announcing succession of Editorship for Writing & Pedagogy:

Effective 1 January 2014, Rodney Hale Jones, Acting Head of the English Department at City University of Hong Kong and the journal’s New Books Editor, assumes the new position of Associate Editor. Starting a year later, on 1 January 2015, Rodney will assume the position of Editor-in-Chief of the journal and Martha C. Pennington will serve for one year as Associate Editor. Martha, who inaugurated the journal in January 2008 and published the first issue in Spring 2009, plans to retire from full-time academic work in 2015.

Rodney holds an M.A. in Teaching English as a Second Language from City University of Hong Kong, an M.F.A. in Creative Writing from University of Arkansas, and a Ph.D. in Applied Linguistics from Macquarie University. He specializes in discourse analysis, digital literacies, and the teaching of writing and is the designer and supervisor of the first-year writing and general education curricula of City University of Hong Kong. He also previously designed peer tutoring and writing-across-the-curriculum support programs for the university. Rodney has won numerous competitive grants in addition to a Pushcart Prize for fiction, and he is the author of Discourse Analysis: A Resource Book for Students (Routledge, 2012), co-author (with Christoph Hafner) of Understanding Digital Literacies: A Practical Introduction (Routledge, 2012), and editor of the forthcoming Routledge Handbook of Language and Creativity.

During 2014, Rodney will work closely with Martha in the early stages of preparing the 2015 issues, for which he will have main responsibility, and searches will be undertaken for a New Books Editor, other section Editors, and members of the Editorial Board to work with Rodney when he assumes theEditor-in-Chief position in 2015. Anyone interested in being considered for one of these positions to begin in 2015 can email Rodney at enrodney@gmail.com with information about qualifications and relevant background.

Writing & Pedagogy expands to 3 issues:

The journal has expanded and will now publish three issues per year: one open topic issue (Spring), one special topic issue (Winter), and one other issue (Summer) – either open topic or special topic. Submissions for all issues of Volume 7 (2015) are now being accepted, including the Spring 2015 open topic issue and the Summer and Winter 2015 special topic issues (see revised Calls for Papers).

Types of Articles

W&P seeks both full-length and short articles on the theory and practice of teaching writing, pedagogical issues and practices of writing in the disciplines, teaching writing to speakers whose primary language is other than English, writing technologies and online contexts, administration of writing programs, assessment of writing, and book reviews.

Featured Essays

Full-length articles (7500-9000 words) offering discussion of major issues in writing and pedagogy.

Research Matters

Full-length articles (7500-9000 words) describing original research, critically reviewing research studies, or otherwise discussing issues of theory and research related to writing and pedagogy. Articles reporting any type of research (linguistic, comparative, ethnographic, survey, historical) are welcome. Evidence of adherence to research guidelines such as review by institutional review board (IRB) may be requested where relevant.

Reflections on Practice

Mid-length articles (3000-5000 words) addressing practical concerns related to writing and pedagogy or describing and critically reflecting on original teaching practices and setting these in a larger context of educational issues or writing theory. We are particularly interested in reflections on teaching ideas that have been refined over a period of time in response to circumstances, or that compare different approaches in relation to actual effects on the students or other outcomes.

From the e-Sphere

Short articles (1000-1200 words) or mid-length articles (3000-5000 words) describing online developments and applications (computer-assisted language learning, web-based applications, wikis, blogosphere, multiliteracies).

New Books

Readers’ reviews of books in any area included in the journal; normally 1000-2500 words but longer comparative or theoretical review articles will be considered. Potential reviewers should first contact the Review Editor to discuss available books for review. Reviewers should aim for an informative and balanced review that includes: an overview of the content of the book, reflections on both its strengths and weaknesses, and an assessment of its audience and value.

Themed Issues

W&P also publishes themed issues, and proposals for these are welcomed.

Revised Call for Submissions Summer 2015 issue:

REVISED CALL FOR PAPERS Vol 7(2) Summer 2015, Special Topic Issue Orality and Literacy in the 21st Century: Prospects for Writing Pedagogy

Twenty-five years ago, Comprehending Oral and Written Language (Horowitz and Samuels, 1987, Academic Press) was published. Chapter One of that book began with the following statement, which still holds:

In the next century it will be virtually impossible to pursue the study of written language and literacy without attention to oral language…. Speculations are that 100 years from now, not only will there be a mingling of research perspectives, but since features associated with oral and written language and social-psychological factors associated with language processes are constantly in a state of flux, our very object of study will also change dramatically. The lexis, grammar, and larger structures of oral language and written language may become alike, with the norm being a writing that is largely indistinguishable from speech. (p. 1)

We are soliciting contributions for a special topic issue on “Orality and Literacy in the 21st Century: Prospects for Writing Pedagogy.” The issue will address attributes of orality and literacy that are gaining heightened attention world-wide and that we believe will significantly influence the nature of classroom instruction in writing. Scholarly examination of oral and literate cultures and spoken-written expression and their cognitive representation will influence the pedagogical practices that are advanced in the 21st century in educational policy, teacher education, and classroom learning and teaching.

The special topic issue will include articles in the categories of critical essay, empirical research, pedagogical reflections, technology-focused or internet-focused articles, and reviews of books to be published in the period from Summer 2013 to Summer 2015. We are seeking articles relevant for any level of education or type of writing pedagogy or practice, such as the following topics and areas of inquiry:

• The evolving nature of orality and literacy, historically and culturally – How are changes in orality and literacy reshaping writing pedagogy? How have the oral and written dimensions of language, whether primary or second languages, been characterized by scholars and how might different perspectives have influence on pedagogical practices in writing?
• The functions of oral vs. written communication among individuals and/or in given social groups or communities – Are the functions of the oral and written dimensions of language changing within specific cultures or social-contextual settings, and if so, how are these changes influencing writing pedagogy?
• Interactions of oral and written expression and knowledge development within different academic disciplines – How is spoken language used to support writing tasks, genres, and writer-reader goals of different academic disciplines? How do oral and written modes of communication interact in contrasting types of knowledge domains, such as in science versus history?
• Ways in which forms of speaking influence writing – How do speech styles and genres work as precursors to writing, and how do they strategically enter into and follow writing? How do discussions influence motivation and processes of writing and the products that are produced by learners? How can students in classrooms progress from spontaneous utterances to more planned discourse?
• Spoken versus written input to writing – What is the comparative value of spoken versus written feedback or other kinds of contributions on students’ writing?
• Linkage of oral and written competence across languages or dialects – How might students’ oral or written competence in their primary language be used to support or enrich writing in another language? How can writing pedagogy incorporate bilingual or bidialectal competence?
• The role of the body in oral versus written expression – How do the mouth, ear, eye, hand, or larger human body contribute to the production of written discourse, such as through incorporation of specific features of oral language, gestures, or overall performance? How do visual and manual processing contribute to writing when writers use specific tools such as pen, computer, or hand-held devices? How should connections between mind and body be studied or employed in writing pedagogy?
• Timing and prosody of speech and writing – How do timing and prosody through features such as intonation units, punctuation, and utterance/sentence length differ in speech versus writing? How are the rhythmic elements of language and discourse conveyed in writing? How might these be taught to developing writers?
• Voice in speech and writing contexts – How is voice conveyed in specific speaking and writing contexts? How do writers adjust voice to geographic space or social-situational contexts? How can voice be defined and developed in the writing curriculum?
• Audience awareness or interaction in speaking versus writing – How is audience incorporated into acts of speaking versus writing, and what are the pedagogical implications?
• Cognition and consciousness in speech and writing – How does written language influence cognition and consciousness differently from speech, and what are the implications for teaching and learning how to write for cognitive development? In what ways are differences in speech and writing as modes of meaning and thinking incorporated into educational curricula?
• Methods of oral and written discourse analysis – What methods, including with technologies, may be useful for the analysis of spoken and written discourse, and how can they be applied to writing pedagogy?

Contributions to this issue may come from researchers and practitioners from a range of disciplines, such as Rhetoric and Composition, Communication, Psychology, Culture Studies, Linguistics, Education, Media and Information Technology, as well as from those interested in writing in specific disciplines. A range of methodologies are welcomed, including quantitative, qualitative, and mixed-method empirical studies as well as historical or issues-centered analysis and pedagogical description and critique. Contributors may suggest an issue or topic that is not listed but that may be germane to the theme of this special issue.

For articles in all categories other than book reviews, interested potential authors should send their email and postal addresses along with a provisional title and draft article or detailed abstract, summary, or outline of contents by email or hard copy by post to the guest editor. For best consideration, submit this by 1 June 2014 or at your earliest convenience. Also send a 75-100 word biographical statement that includes highest degree and where from, current institutional affiliation and job title, and major achievements. For book reviews, please notify the guest editor of relevant books to appear in the period of Summer 2013 to Summer 2015 and whether you would like to be considered as a possible reviewer of a specific book or books, for which the reviewer would receive a free copy. If you wish to be considered as a reviewer, also send email and postal address along with a 75-100 word biographical statement that includes highest degree and where from, current institutional affiliation and job title, and major achievements.

Guest editor contact information:
Professor Rosalind Horowitz
Rosalind.Horowitz@utsa.edu
Discourse and Literacy Studies
Department of Interdisciplinary Learning and Teaching
College of Education and Human Development
The University of Texas–San Antonio
One UTSA Circle
San Antonio, Texas 78249-0654
USA

Potential contributors will be notified within two months of submission of a decision about their proposed contribution and, if positive, given feedback towards a first or revised draft. The final deadline for complete papers to be received is 1 December 2014. Both the guest editor and the other editors of the journal will work closely with selected authors to aid in producing a unique and memorable issue on this important topic.

Revised Call for Submissions Winter 2015 issue:

REVISED CALL FOR PAPERS Vol 7(3) Winter 2015, Special Topic Issue Writing Assessment

Thirty years ago, writing assessment appeared to be the intellectual domain of a relatively few testing experts worldwide and to be the commercial domain of even fewer commercial testing agencies. The main activity revolved around the generation of valid and reliable summative scores for a range of gatekeeping purposes such as university entrance, job promotion, and immigration prerequisites. However, the field of testing and assessment has opened up in a remarkable way over the last two decades, embracing and supporting classroom writing pedagogies at schools and universities, and embracing and supporting a range of workplace and professional writing needs. So in 2015, what is this thing we call writing assessment, and how and why has the change come about?

The changes are multifaceted and are not confined to changes in pedagogy, but also involve changes in, and the potentials of, new technologies and the new demands of the globalized world around us. In pedagogy, language teachers now talk and practice “assessment for learning,” seen in the adoption of a range of formative assessment practices for diagnostic and writing improvement purposes. In addition, these same teachers in decentralized school and university contexts take more responsibility for the design and use of “assessment of learning,” that is, summative assessment of their students’ work.

Students today construct writing in different ways using new technologies, and writing assessment practitioners are exploring the possibilities of using automated scoring and feedback. These new practices must ultimately change how we currently assess writing both formatively and summatively.

Finally, in our globalized world, questions are being asked about what constitutes good writing in the different contexts and audiences for which we write. How do we assess, for example, the business correspondence of a Chinese business manager writing to her colleagues in the Asian region where the recipients are also second language writers (and readers)? All of these contexts, changes, and questions set a broad agenda in this call for writing assessment contributions from colleagues researching and practising in this area.

Invitations for papers on writing assessment broadly fall under the following themes:

(i) Writing assessment practices and policies in primary and secondary schools
(ii) The link between pedagogy and assessment in schools and universities
(iii) Re-evaluating high stakes writing assessment in different contexts
(iv) Writing assessment in local and global workplaces
(v) Writing assessment technologies and possibilities
(vi) Formative writing assessment practices and the place of feedback

Contributors may suggest an issue or topic that is not listed but that may be germane to the theme of this special issue.

We seek articles in all categories, as follows:

• Featured Essay A mid-length or full-length article which argues a controversial point, advocates for a specific theoretical position or type of practice, reviews issues, or presents new ideas about writing assessment;
• Research Matters A full-length article which presents empirical research (e.g. comparative research, developmental study, ethnographic research, case study, issues-centered survey, etc.) on writing assessment;
• Reflections on Practice A mid-length referenced discussion of practices relating to the assessment of writing;
• From the eSphere A short, mid-length, or full-length discussion or description focused on new technologies or new uses of familiar technology and/or the internet in writing assessment;
• New Books A short review or full-length review article on books published or to be published in 2014 or 2015 that center on writing assessment.

For articles in all categories other than book reviews, interested potential authors should send their email and postal addresses along with a provisional title and draft article or detailed abstract, summary, or outline of contents by email or hard copy by post to the guest editor. For best consideration, submit this by 1 August 2014. Also send a 75–90 word biographical statement that includes highest degree and where from, current institutional affiliation and job title, and major achievements. For book reviews, please notify the guest editor of relevant books to appear in 2014 or 2015 and whether you would like to be considered as a possible reviewer of a specific book or books, for which the reviewer would receive a free copy. If you wish to be considered as a reviewer, also send email and postal address along with a 75–90 word biographical statement that includes highest degree and where from, current institutional affiliation and job title, and major achievements.

Guest editor contact information:
Dr. Jane Lockwood
lockwood@cityu.edu.hk
English Department
City University of Hong Kong
Run Run Shaw Creative Media Centre
Cornwall Street
Kowloon Tong, Kowloon
Hong Kong

Potential contributors will be notified within two months of submission of a decision about their proposed contribution and, if positive, given feedback towards a first or revised draft. Both the guest editor and the other editors of the journal will work closely with selected authors to aid in producing a unique, cutting-edge issue on this important topic.

3 issues per year (Spring, Winter, Summer)
ISSN: 1756-5839 (print)
ISSN: 1756-5847 (online)

Editorial Address:
Writing and Pedagogy
Department of English
City University of Hong Kong
Creative Media Centre
Cornwall Street
Kowloon Tong, Kowloon
Hong Kong

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