Table of Contents

Prelims

Rebecca Coyle published on screen music and sound in a number of journals and books, including two anthologies on Australian feature film music. She was the editor of Screen Sound, the Australasian Journal of Soundtrack Studies and on the editorial board for such international journals as Convergence and Music and the Moving Image. She taught in the Media programme at Southern Cross University, Australia, until her death in November 2012.
Rebecca Coyle published on screen music and sound in a number of journals and books, including two anthologies on Australian feature film music. She was the editor of Screen Sound, the Australasian Journal of Soundtrack Studies and on the editorial board for such international journals as Convergence and Music and the Moving Image. She taught in the Media programme at Southern Cross University, Australia, until her death in November 2012.
Rebecca Coyle published on screen music and sound in a number of journals and books, including two anthologies on Australian feature film music. She was the editor of Screen Sound, the Australasian Journal of Soundtrack Studies and on the editorial board for such international journals as Convergence and Music and the Moving Image. She taught in the Media programme at Southern Cross University, Australia, until her death in November 2012.
This book spotlights animation as an audio-visual film form but positions the focus on its audio elements.

Part I: Scoring Animation Film

Birmingham Conservatoire
Janet K. Halfyard is a Senior Academic in Music at Birmingham Conservatoire. She has published widely on film and television music, particularly in relation to horror and fantasy genres. Her publications include Danny Elfman’s Batman: a film score guide (Scarecrow, 2004) and Music, Sound and Silence in Buffy the Vampire Slayer (Ashgate, 2010).
This chapter discusses the working practices involved in realizing the films and the way in which both Burton and Elfman place their individually distinctive imprint on the outcomes in truly collaborative works. It examines the ways in which music and songs help to structure the films themselves and allow humour and horror to be juxtaposed.
Paul Wells £10.00
This chapter explores Halas & Batchelor’s responses to different animated musical forms over time and, most importantly, analyse the particular approach to animation soundtracks within the British context, set against its more well-known and acknowledged American cartoon counterparts.
Otsuma Women’s University
Kyoko Koizumi is an associate professor of music at Otsuma Women’s University, Tokyo, Japan. She received her PhD from the University of London Institute of Education. Her research interests include youth studies of popular music and film music studies.
This chapter investigates the musical styles and idioms of Hisaishi’s scores for Miyazaki’s animated films as a way of analysing them.

Part II: Musical Intertextuality

University of Northumbria
Ian Inglis is Visiting Fellow in the School of Arts & Social Sciences at the University of Northumbria, Newcastle upon Tyne. His most recent books include The Words and Music of George Harrison (2010), Popular Music and Television in Britain (2010) and The Beatles in Hamburg (2012). His first novel Clay Lake is scheduled for publication in 2012.
Yellow Submarine’s assembly of musical items – some old songs from the group’s previous records, some ‘borrowed’ and recycled from its store of discarded material, some new instrumental segments – was at the time difficult for a general popular-music audience to recognize as an authentic Beatles product. Furthermore, its collection of nursery-rhyme, music-hall, Indian-derived, rock, pop, psychedelic and orchestral styles defied any attempts at easy categorization. However, although audiences may have been deterred by these apparent inconsistencies, there is little doubt that for those involved in its production, the interplay between music and animation was crucial to its eventual ‘classic’ status.
Southern Cross Univeristy
Philip Hayward has taught film and popular music studies in Australia and the United Kingdom and is Professor and Deputy Pro Vice Chancellor (Research) at Southern Cross University, Australia. His previous books include Off The Planet: Music, Sound and Science Fiction Cinema (2004) and he is a performer in an avant garde chainsaw quartet performing work written by composer Michael Hannan.
This chapter analyses the operation of the “accidental musical” text of the film. It considers the nature of the ‘iconic’ songs presented, the role of tap-dancing in relation to these and, in conclusion, how these relate to the eco-political messages that are heavily inscribed within the text.
Neil Lerner £10.00
WFRR brings the traditions of cartoons and minstrelsy together, although it is not the first example of animation to indulge in the imagery and racism of minstrelsy. The film contains several elements of minstrel performances: singing, dancing, telling jokes, and while there is no direct representation of blackening the face with burnt cork, some more implicit vestiges of that part of minstrelsy may remain in WFRR’s use of ape imagery.
Janice Esther Tulk £10.00
This chapter first provides a brief overview of the representation of indigenous peoples in film. It turns to the animated film Brother Bear and demonstrates that the scripted motifs have antecedents in the folklore of several indigenous cultures.

Part III: Music and Sonicity

Daniel Goldmark £10.00
Les Triplettes de Belleville is the story of two historical eras – the nostalgic past and the crushing present – that intersect on two continents. The film thrives on nostalgia largely based on a narrative element introduced early in the film with a single line of dialogue. Presented as a function of memory, the idea of nostalgia relies heavily on sound design to establish connections to the characters’ past, to distant history, to other places altogether.
Jon Fitzgerald,Philip Hayward £10.00
Southern Cross University
Jon Fitzgerald is an associate professor at Southern Cross University, Lismore, and a practising guitarist and composer. He has previously written on a variety of musical topics and is author of Popular Music: Theory and Musicianship (1999).
This chapter analyses The Brave Little Toaster's uses of sound and music, locates these within the interrelated threads of its narrative themes and references to animation history and, offers a perspective on its production moment and the changing character of the latetwentieth- century animation industry.
Kentaro Imada £10.00
Lupin III comprises several television anime series and theatrically released films that were screened in Japan over a twenty-five-year period. This chapter analyses gekiban (dramatic accompaniment), the music used in Japanese animated films, by examining the Lupin III film products.

Part IV: Music and Industrial Contexts

Rebecca Coyle †,Sarah P. Morris £10.00
Rebecca Coyle published on screen music and sound in a number of journals and books, including two anthologies on Australian feature film music. She was the editor of Screen Sound, the Australasian Journal of Soundtrack Studies and on the editorial board for such international journals as Convergence and Music and the Moving Image. She taught in the Media programme at Southern Cross University, Australia, until her death in November 2012.
Wallace and Gromit are the claymation characters devised by British animation director Nick Park. This chapter charts an aspect of Aardman’s transition to feature-film productions in Hollywood through an exploration of the music approach employed in Wallace & Gromit: The Curse of the Were-Rabbit.
Aki Yamasaki £10.00
This chapter examines recent trends in animation soundtrack CD sales in Japan in relation to the distinctive character of the animation business. Animation music is well supported in Japan due to industry factors that impact on the sound of animation films.
Rebecca Coyle published on screen music and sound in a number of journals and books, including two anthologies on Australian feature film music. She was the editor of Screen Sound, the Australasian Journal of Soundtrack Studies and on the editorial board for such international journals as Convergence and Music and the Moving Image. She taught in the Media programme at Southern Cross University, Australia, until her death in November 2012.
Southern Cross University
Jon Fitzgerald is an associate professor at Southern Cross University, Lismore, and a practising guitarist and composer. He has previously written on a variety of musical topics and is author of Popular Music: Theory and Musicianship (1999).
This chapter discusses approaches to the place and role of music in The Little Mermaid, and analyses some of the specific techniques employed in the songs and orchestral score. It then discusses the ways in which The Lion King successfully adapted and extended these approaches, using additional musical elements.

End Matter

Index 249-258
Rebecca Coyle published on screen music and sound in a number of journals and books, including two anthologies on Australian feature film music. She was the editor of Screen Sound, the Australasian Journal of Soundtrack Studies and on the editorial board for such international journals as Convergence and Music and the Moving Image. She taught in the Media programme at Southern Cross University, Australia, until her death in November 2012.

Reviews

As the first of its kind, this anthology will be an invaluable resource for students, teachers and researchers in film, animation, culture, music and media studies.
Rick Altman, Professor Cinema and Comparative Literature, University of Iowa

The collection as a whole is good, and the four chapters in the ‘Musical Intertextuality’ section are among the most engaging and well written. Given the broad range of animated films considered – included among them a number of familiar blockbusters – this collection would function well as a resource for introductory courses dedicated to music in animated films. Recommended. Lower and upper-division undergraduates, graduate students, general readers.
S.C. Pelkey, Western Michigan University, CHOICE, December 2010, Vol. 48, No. 04

Presents itself as a long-overdue and most welcome addition to the existing scholarship on animation, film, and film music studies, and offers a wealth of information suitable for undergraduate and postgraduate students and academics across a variety of disciplines.
Áine Mangaoang, Music, Sound and the Moving Image, 5.2, Autumn 2011

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