Chinese Discourse and Interaction - Theory and Practice - Yuling Pan

Chinese Discourse and Interaction - Theory and Practice - Yuling Pan

11. Chinese prenatal genetic counselling discourse in Hong Kong: Healthcare providers’ (non)directive stance, or who is making the decision?

Chinese Discourse and Interaction - Theory and Practice - Yuling Pan

Virginia Wake Yelei
Georgetown University
Stephanie Schnurr [+-]
University of Warwick
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My main research interests are professional and medical communication. I am particularly interested in leadership, and the crucial role that communication plays in leadership performance. I have researched and published widely on various aspects of leadership discourse, gender, the multiple functions and strategic uses of humour, politeness and impoliteness, identity construction, the role of culture, decision making and advice giving, and other aspects of workplace discourse in a range of professional and medical contexts.
Olga Zayts [+-]
The University of Hong Kong
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I arrived in Hong Kong in December 2003 after completing my PhD studies in St. Petersburg, Russia, and have researched and taught in this vibrant city ever since. My areas of expertise and research interests broadly include interactional approaches to professional communication, in particular in healthcare and business settings. In the past few years I have been working on a number of research projects studying social interactions in the genetic counselling and prenatal screening contexts in Hong Kong in collaboration with public hospitals and the Clinical Genetic Services of Hong Kong. I have also been studying business interactions in a number of large international corporations and privately-owned businesses.Currently I lead the Health Communication Research Cluster at the Center for the Humanities and Medicine, HKU where I also serve as a Board Member; and I am a member of the Consortium on Clinical Genetics and Genomic Medicine (Hong Kong West Cluster (HKWC)/HKU) that strives to improve genetic and genomic services in Hong Kong. Besides work, I also love spending time with my two sons and enjoy trail running around Asia.

Description

In this chapter we take a discourse analytic perspective and examine the Chinese institutional discourse of prenatal genetic counselling (henceforth, PGC) in Hong Kong. We focus on the interactions between Chinese healthcare providers and patients1 and examine how the notion of nondirectiveness, which has historically been adopted as the guiding principle in the genetic counselling profession, is challenged in this sociocultural context. Our interest in the Hong Kong context is twofold: first, the genetic counselling profession is still establishing itself in the region (Lam 2006); therefore the tenets guiding the profession are also being established and negotiated by the professionals. In addition, compared to other countries (e.g. the US and the UK), there are very few discourse and conversation analytic studies of genetic counselling in Hong Kong (Zayts and Kang 2009, 2010; Zayts and Schnurr 2011). This chapter contributes to this emerging body of research by examining Chinese interactional data.

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Citation

Yelei, Virginia; Schnurr, Stephanie; Zayts, Olga. 11. Chinese prenatal genetic counselling discourse in Hong Kong: Healthcare providers’ (non)directive stance, or who is making the decision?. Chinese Discourse and Interaction - Theory and Practice. Equinox eBooks Publishing, United Kingdom. p. 228-247 Jan 2013. ISBN 9781845536329. https://www.equinoxpub.com/home/view-chapter/?id=20074. Date accessed: 07 Jun 2020 doi: 10.1558/equinox.20074. Jan 2013

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