Heavy Metal - Controversies and Countercultures - Titus Hjelm

Heavy Metal - Controversies and Countercultures - Titus Hjelm

Suicide solutions? Or, how the emo class of 2008 were able to contest their media demonization, whereas the headbangers, burnouts or ‘children of ZoSo’ generation were not

Heavy Metal - Controversies and Countercultures - Titus Hjelm

Andy R. Brown
Bath Spa University

Description

Drawing on historical and contemporary material, this chapter seeks to contrast the ‘suicide epidemic’ reporting that characterized the ‘moral panic’ press and media coverage of the popularity of heavy metal with white, sub- urban lower-class 80s youth in the United States (a group poignantly evoked by Donna Gaines’ (1990) phrase, ‘the children of ZoSo’)1 with a more recent episode, that surrounding the sensationalist press coverage of the ‘emo sub-culture’ in the UK, and its alleged promotion of teen self-harm and suicide, claimed to be found in the lyrics of The Black Parade (2006) album by ‘emo’ band, My Chemical Romance.

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Citation

Brown, Andy. Suicide solutions? Or, how the emo class of 2008 were able to contest their media demonization, whereas the headbangers, burnouts or ‘children of ZoSo’ generation were not. Heavy Metal - Controversies and Countercultures. Equinox eBooks Publishing, United Kingdom. p. 17 - 35 Apr 2013. ISBN 9781845539412. https://www.equinoxpub.com/home/view-chapter/?id=20693. Date accessed: 28 Mar 2017 doi: 10.1558/equinox.20693. Apr 2013

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