The Imagined Sky - Cultural Perspectives - Darrelyn Gunzburg

The Imagined Sky - Cultural Perspectives - Darrelyn Gunzburg

Astrology as a Social Framework: The ‘Children of Planets’, 1400–1600

The Imagined Sky - Cultural Perspectives - Darrelyn Gunzburg

Geoffrey Shamos
RedLine Contemporary Art Center, Denver

Description

During the Early Modern period, many believed that the seven planets— Mercury, Venus, Mars, Jupiter, Saturn, the Sun, and the Moon—affected the course of terrestrial events and determined the temperament, complexion, profession, and even the manner of death of individuals. Such concepts were depicted by artists in a series of images commonly referred to as the ‘Children of the Planets’. By merging scientific knowledge and popular imagery, the convention helped to shape the contemporary understanding of the cosmos. Astrology is often described in terms of the correspondence between the macrocosm and the microcosm or the universe and the individual, but by linking diverse individuals according to mutual planetary affiliations, the ‘Children of the Planets’ also offered a system for categorizing corporate identity and defining social relations.

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Citation

Shamos, Geoffrey. Astrology as a Social Framework: The ‘Children of Planets’, 1400–1600. The Imagined Sky - Cultural Perspectives. Equinox eBooks Publishing, United Kingdom. p. 114-141 Jun 2016. ISBN 9781781791684. https://www.equinoxpub.com/home/view-chapter/?id=22669. Date accessed: 19 Jun 2024 doi: 10.1558/equinox.22669. Jun 2016

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