Chasing Down Religion - In the Sights of History and the Cognitive Sciences - Panayotis Pachis

Chasing Down Religion - In the Sights of History and the Cognitive Sciences - Panayotis Pachis

Disciplinary Clans

Chasing Down Religion - In the Sights of History and the Cognitive Sciences - Panayotis Pachis

Steven Hrotic [+-]
Steven Hrotic primary interests concern universal patterns of human behavior as rooted in our evolutionarily constrained cognition. This has led him to study primate behavior, religion, and implicit cultural schema. Following a year of fieldwork, his current research investigates how academic thought and practice, idealized as perfectly objective and impersonal, may nevertheless reflect biases based in our biological heritage.

Description

Academic disciplines are commonsensically defined as a ‘data set’ – a subset of the facts, theories, and methods that constitute academic knowledge. However, this view cannot alone account for the boundaries between disciplines, nor disciplines’ characters. Hrotic suggests that disciplines are quasi-social networks. Interactions within academic alliances result in discipline-specific cultural schema, which are used to identify ‘social’ group members. This plays a beneficial functional role by organizing academia into coherent ‘clans’. Disciplines are not imposed by academic leadership, but are an emergent property of academia as a self-organizing system. The Religion department at the University of Vermont is presented as an example.

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Citation

Hrotic, Steven. Disciplinary Clans. Chasing Down Religion - In the Sights of History and the Cognitive Sciences. Equinox eBooks Publishing, United Kingdom. p. 197-214 Dec 2014. ISBN 9781781792070. https://www.equinoxpub.com/home/view-chapter/?id=22842. Date accessed: 09 Aug 2020 doi: 10.1558/equinox.22842. Dec 2014

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