Death's Dominion - Power, Identity, and Memory at the Fourth-Century Martyr Shrine - Nathaniel J. Morehouse

Death's Dominion - Power, Identity, and Memory at the Fourth-Century Martyr Shrine - Nathaniel J. Morehouse

To Build Up: The Erection of Shrine and Reputation

Death's Dominion - Power, Identity, and Memory at the Fourth-Century Martyr Shrine - Nathaniel J. Morehouse

Nathaniel J. Morehouse [+-]
John Carroll University
Nathaniel J. Morehouse received his MA in Religious Studies from New York University and his Ph.D. in Religious Studies from the University of Manitoba. He currently lives in Northeast Ohio where he teaches courses in Religious Studies and Philosophy.

Description

Chapter two moves on to examine how two seminal early fourth-century figures, Constantine and Damasus, helped determine the development of the veneration of the martyrs. Constantine was responsible for the construction of numerous church structures, and explicitly developed the basilica as a seat of Christian power. Many, if not all of these structures incorporated pre-existent martyr veneration, which Constantine sought to harness for his own purposes. Ultimately Constantine would design his own funerary monument in Constantinople and, through his translation of the relics of Stephen and Luke, lay the foundation for a trans-local understanding of the remains of the important dead. Damasus, the bishop of Rome, following Constantine, sought to deal with his own issues of control by presenting a unified image of the church though the inscriptions that he placed around the tombs of the martyrs.

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Citation

Morehouse, Nathaniel . To Build Up: The Erection of Shrine and Reputation. Death's Dominion - Power, Identity, and Memory at the Fourth-Century Martyr Shrine. Equinox eBooks Publishing, United Kingdom. p. 53-81 Sep 2016. ISBN 9781781790823. https://www.equinoxpub.com/home/view-chapter/?id=24164. Date accessed: 14 Oct 2019 doi: 10.1558/equinox.24164. Sep 2016

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