Marine Ventures - Archaeological Perspectives on Human-Sea Relations - Hein B. Bjerck

Marine Ventures - Archaeological Perspectives on Human-Sea Relations - Hein B. Bjerck

4. Exploring the Role of Pinnipeds in the Human Colonization of the Seascapes of Patagonia and Scandinavia

Marine Ventures - Archaeological Perspectives on Human-Sea Relations - Hein B. Bjerck

Hein B. Bjerck [+-]
Norwegian University of Science and Technology (NTNU)
Hein B. Bjerck is professor in archaeology (research and teaching) at the NTNU University Museum in Trondheim. His research is focussed on early marine foraging (Marine Ventures project), and large scale excavation projects (Ormen Lange project). Bjerck is also involved in research on the recent past, and project member in Ruin Memories, After Discourse and Objects Matter.
Heidi Mjelva Breivik [+-]
Department of Historical Studies, Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Trondheim, Norway.
Heidi Mjelva Breivik holds a PhD in archaeology from the Norwegian University of Science and Technology in Trondheim. Her research focusses Early Stone Age with emphasis on marine foragers, human–environment relations, technology and settlement patterns.
Ernesto L. Piana
National University of Tierra del Fuego
A. Francisco J. Zangrando [+-]
Laboratory of Anthropology CADIC-CONICET
Atilio Francisco Zangrando is a full-time researcher at CADIC-CONICET (Argentina), and part-time lecturer at the University of Buenos Aires. His current research focuses on marine hunter-gatherers in southern South America, and includes coastal archaeology, settlement patterns, zooarchaeology and stable isotopes.

Description

Pinnipeds (seals) were probably important pull factors for the terrestrial hunter-gatherers that became marine foragers in the seascapes of Patagonia and Scandinavia in early Holocene. Important reasons for this may be that 1) pinnipeds could be hunted on shores (or sea-ice) with more or less the same methods and equipment as terrestrial animals, 2) pinnipeds represented a similar resource as the terrestrial mega-fauna, with a familiar combination of meat, bone, skin, blood, sinews, and fat, and 3) that most evolutionary victories of pinnipeds pertain to their life in the water – and left them quite vulnerable when they are out of the water. Their senses and locomotion are inferior to terrestrial animals – a weakness that human predators are always ready to exploit. This paper will explore the nature of pinnipeds, their habitats and behavior, and discuss how pinnipeds might have related to and influenced the early development of marine foraging systems – technology, logistics, and settlement structure. The timing, circumstances, cultural dynamics and species of pinnipeds involved in the Scandinavian and the Patagonian case differ. However, the two processes towards marine adaptation also have instructive parallels.

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Citation

Bjerck, Hein; Breivik, Heidi; Piana, Ernesto; Zangrando, A. Francisco J. . 4. Exploring the Role of Pinnipeds in the Human Colonization of the Seascapes of Patagonia and Scandinavia. Marine Ventures - Archaeological Perspectives on Human-Sea Relations. Equinox eBooks Publishing, United Kingdom. p. 53-73 Nov 2016. ISBN 9781781791363. https://www.equinoxpub.com/home/view-chapter/?id=24552. Date accessed: 22 Nov 2019 doi: 10.1558/equinox.24552. Nov 2016

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