Continuing Discourse on Language - A Functional Perspective, Volumes 1 and 2 - Ruqaiya Hasan†

Continuing Discourse on Language - A Functional Perspective, Volumes 1 and 2 - Ruqaiya Hasan†

28. Auxiliary Extensions: six new elements for describing English

Continuing Discourse on Language - A Functional Perspective, Volumes 1 and 2 - Ruqaiya Hasan†

Robin Fawcett [+-]
Cardiff University, (Emeritus)
Robin Fawcett is Emeritus Professor in Linguistics and Director of the Computational Linguistics Unit, Centre for Language and Communication Research, Cardiff University. His research interests include general linguistics, systemic functional linguistics in a socio-cognitive framework, the computer modelling of language in both generation and understanding, and English and other languages for both of these purposes and for the analysis of texts. His most recent publications include Meaning and Form: Systemic Functional Interpretations (co-edited with M. Berry, C. Butler and G. Huang, 1996). He is also the series editor for Functional Linguistics and Discussions in Functional Approaches to Language, both published by Equinox.

Description

This chapter is offered as an example of the type of contribution to Systemic Functional Grammar (SFG) that is made by those working in the framework of the ‘Cardiff Grammar’ (a version of SFG about which I shall say a little more shortly). Thus, like the chapter by Tucker, it is an illustration of the type of detailed, comprehensive description of English that is required in the fully explicit SFG that we believe to be needed, if we are to meet the requirements of the users of our descriptions that we should expect in the twenty-first century. Specifically, this chapter seeks to contribute to the ‘continuing discourse’ about how best to model the lexicogrammar of English by suggesting the value of incorporating in our descriptions certain new elements of structure (and so their meanings) which have so far received short shrift in most grammars – including most Systemic Functional Grammars. Yet these items occur with a frequency that is already considerable and that is, I suggest, increasing. They are all exponents of what we shall term the Auxiliary Extensions (XEx), and they occur as part of what have been called ‘phrasal modals’.

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Citation

Fawcett, Robin. 28. Auxiliary Extensions: six new elements for describing English. Continuing Discourse on Language - A Functional Perspective, Volumes 1 and 2. Equinox eBooks Publishing, United Kingdom. p. 921-952 Nov 2005. ISBN 9781845531140. https://www.equinoxpub.com/home/view-chapter/?id=25354. Date accessed: 06 Feb 2023 doi: 10.1558/equinox.25354. Nov 2005

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