Anime, Religion and Spirituality - Profane and Sacred Worlds in Contemporary Japan - Katherine Buljan

Anime, Religion and Spirituality - Profane and Sacred Worlds in Contemporary Japan - Katherine Buljan

Power Within: The Fan’s Embrace of Profane and Sacred Worlds in Anime

Anime, Religion and Spirituality - Profane and Sacred Worlds in Contemporary Japan - Katherine Buljan

Katherine Buljan [+-]
Independent scholar
Katharine Buljan was awarded a PhD from the University of Sydney in 2007 and is a scholar and visual artist/animator.
Carole M. Cusack [+-]
University of Sydney
Carole M. Cusack is Professor of Religious Studies at the University of Sydney. She researches and teaches on contemporary religious trends (including pilgrimage and tourism, modern Pagan religions, NRMs, and religion and popular culture). Her books include Invented Religions: Imagination, Fiction and Faith (Ashgate, 2010) and (with Katharine Buljan) Anime, Religion, and Spirituality: Profane and Sacred Worlds in Contemporary Japan (Equinox, 2015). In 2016 she became Editor of Fieldwork in Religion, and she is also Editor of Literature & Aesthetics (journal of the Sydney Society of Literature and Aesthetics).

Description

Some anime aficionados can rightly be called ‘devotees’ as they manifest a deep, almost religious, devotion to anime in various ways. They seek to make personal connections with events and characters of anime stories through visits to anime conventions, the performance activity cosplay (‘costume play’), and travel to cities, towns and natural sites in Japan that are featured in anime. It is clear that these fan phenomena are not unique to anime or only observable in Japan, as over the last twenty years there has been a small but growing body of scholarship produced that deals with both Western fan behaviours and the possible religio-spiritual motivations and benefits of these individual and communal activities. This chapter will draw upon these studies, particular those focused on the fan community attached to Gene Roddenberry’s cult American television and film series Star Trek (debuted 1965), to establish a framework for interpreting anime fandom, in addition to specific studies of anime aficionados. The purpose of this chapter is to investigate the intense, almost religious, nature of anime aficionados’ close relationship to the object of their devotion, anime.

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Citation

Buljan, Katherine; Cusack, Carole M. Power Within: The Fan’s Embrace of Profane and Sacred Worlds in Anime. Anime, Religion and Spirituality - Profane and Sacred Worlds in Contemporary Japan. Equinox eBooks Publishing, United Kingdom. p. 163-208 Apr 2015. ISBN 9781781791103. https://www.equinoxpub.com/home/view-chapter/?id=25890. Date accessed: 28 Jan 2020 doi: 10.1558/equinox.25890. Apr 2015

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