Sociocultural Theory and the Teaching of Second Languages - James P. Lantolf

Sociocultural Theory and the Teaching of Second Languages - James P. Lantolf

8 French as a Second Language: University Students Learn the Grammatical Concept of Voice: Study Design, Materials Development, and Pilot Data

Sociocultural Theory and the Teaching of Second Languages - James P. Lantolf

Sharon Lapkin [+-]
University of Toronto Scarborough
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Dr. Lapkin is currently Professor Emerita in the Second Language Education Program of the Department of Curriculum, Teaching and Learning. She received the Prix Robert Roy from the Canadian Association of Second Language Teachers in 2006.
Merrill Swain [+-]
University of Toronto
Dr. Merrill Swain is Professor Emeritus at OISE/UT.  There, she has taught and conducted research for 40 years. Her interests include bilingual education and second language learning, teaching and testing. She is author of over 150 articles published in refereed journals, as well as many book chapters.  Her present research focuses on the role of collaborative dialogue and “languaging” in second language learning.  She was President of AAAL, and VP of AILA. She was presented AAALs’ 2004 Distinguished Scholarship and Service Award. She received an Honorary Doctorate from the University of Vaasa in Finland in 2011.Merrill has recently co-authored a textbook which introduces Sociocultural Theory through narratives of second language learning and teaching. 
Ibtissem Knouzi [+-]
University of Toronto
Modern Languages Center Ontario Institute for Studies in Education

Description

The next chapter in this subsection, by Lapkin, Swain and Knouzi, ‘French as a Second Language University Students Learn the Grammatical Concept of Voice: Study Design, Materials Development and Pilot Data’ reports on a study inspired by Negueruela’s (2003) dissertation. The study focuses on only one aspect of CBI as implemented by Negueruela – the importance of verbalization of the concept as part of the internalization process. In addition to the SCT-informed work of Negueruela, Lapkin et al. also point out that empirical, atheoretical research in science and math education report positive effects when learners explained complex concepts to themselves aloud. In the study, the authors developed an explanation of the grammatical concept of voice in French. Intermediate-level university students of the language were trained to self-explain, exposed to a text with sentences in the active, passive and middle voices in the language and were asked to talk their way through an explanation of the concept. The researchers then administered an immediate and delayed posttest to the students. Interviews conducted with the students along with the pilot data suggest that learning occurred and that students perceived this approach to be an effective way to learn.

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Citation

Lapkin, Sharon; Swain, Merrill; Knouzi, Ibtissem. 8 French as a Second Language: University Students Learn the Grammatical Concept of Voice: Study Design, Materials Development, and Pilot Data. Sociocultural Theory and the Teaching of Second Languages. Equinox eBooks Publishing, United Kingdom. p. 228-255 Jul 2008. ISBN 9781845532505. https://www.equinoxpub.com/home/view-chapter/?id=29309. Date accessed: 21 Feb 2024 doi: 10.1558/equinox.29309. Jul 2008

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