4. The Curious Case of the Drs. D’Abreu: Catholicism, Migration and a Kanara Catholic Family in the Heart of the Empire, 1890-1950

Translocal Lives and Religion - Connections between Asia and Europe in the Late Modern World - Philippe Bornet

Dwayne Ryan Menezes [+-]
University of Cambridge
Dr Dwayne Ryan Menezes is an Associate Fellow at the Institute of Commonwealth Studies, University of London. He read Imperial and Ecclesiastical History at the LSE and the University of Cambridge, graduating from the latter with a PhD in History. He served as Researcher at the Centre of Governance and Human Rights (CGHR) at the University of Cambridge; Visiting Academic at the Centre on Migration, Policy and Society (COMPAS) at the University of Oxford; and as Postdoctoral Research Fellow at Heythrop College, University of London. Dr Menezes also acted until recently as Consultant to the Secretary-General of the Commonwealth and continues to serve as Founder and Director of Human Security Centre (HSC) and Polar Research and Policy Initiative (PRPI).

Description

In the late-nineteenth and early-twentieth centuries, several Catholics from South Kanara in British India, whether as British subjects or Indo-Portuguese Catholics, journeyed across the wider British, Portuguese and Catholic worlds. Wherever they travelled or settled, they often strategically deployed their Catholicism, distinctive Anglo-Luso-Brahmin culture and ambiguities about their racial heritage to overcome structural barriers to the mobility and assimilation of South Asians. Catholicism, with its numerous institutions, lay and clerical transnational networks, and doctrinal emphasis on universalism emerged as a particularly valuable tool that some could deploy for the purpose of assimilation. Catholicism would not only facilitate intermarriages with Catholics of other ethnicities, but also enable racial ‘passing’ and other forms of strategic ethnic re-identification. By focusing on the D’Abreu family from Mangalore, members of which journeyed to the British Isles since 1890, this study shall uncover the forgotten history of an Indian Catholic family that embedded itself within the heart of British society. It shall explore how, by strategically emphasising the Catholic and Portuguese markers of their multifaceted identities, the D’Abreu boys acquired a subsidised education at Stonyhurst; became celebrated surgeons; and married into the highest rungs of the European Catholic gentry and aristocracy. It shall explore both the transnational practices and networks of Catholicism and investigate the extent to which Catholicism could facilitate migration and aid assimilation.

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Citation

Menezes, Dwayne . 4. The Curious Case of the Drs. D’Abreu: Catholicism, Migration and a Kanara Catholic Family in the Heart of the Empire, 1890-1950. Translocal Lives and Religion - Connections between Asia and Europe in the Late Modern World. Equinox eBooks Publishing, United Kingdom. p. Oct 2018. ISBN 9781781795835. https://www.equinoxpub.com/home/view-chapter/?id=31741. Date accessed: 21 Nov 2017 doi: 10.1558/equinox.31741. Oct 2018

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