New Dimension into the Deep-sea Exploitation: Visual Clues of the Rock Art of White Sea and Alta

Perspectives on Differences in Rock Art - Jan Magne Gjerde

Liliana Janik [+-]
University of Cambridge
Dr Liliana Janik is Assistant Director of Research, Deputy Director of the Cambridge Heritage Research Centre and Fellow of Girton College, University of Cambridge.She leads research projects in Japan and Russia. She specialises in prehistoric art: rock art, sculpture, and neuroaesthetic approaches to art, as well as heritage of the landscape.

Description

The antiquity of deep-sea hunting has been acknowledged among scholars who study historical and ethnographic records of such practices in the northern Hemisphere, although its chronological depth is still being discussed. One way to establish when marine hunting and fishing started, I propose here, is to look at the rock art of northern Europe for the visual indicators left for us by the prehistoric carvers. I will focus on the evidence of deep sea hunting (beluga whale) and fishing (halibut) with the use of a harpoon, a float and a lines-and-hook. Examples will be presented illustrating the presence of deep sea exploitation by prehistoric communities, dating to over 7,000 years ago from Besovy Sledki, White Sea, Russia and Alta, Norway.

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Citation

Janik, Liliana. New Dimension into the Deep-sea Exploitation: Visual Clues of the Rock Art of White Sea and Alta. Perspectives on Differences in Rock Art. Equinox eBooks Publishing, United Kingdom. p. Nov 2020. ISBN 9781781795606. https://www.equinoxpub.com/home/view-chapter/?id=31917. Date accessed: 10 Aug 2020 doi: 10.1558/equinox.31917. Nov 2020

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