Children in Minority Religions - Growing Up in Controversial Religious Groups - Liselotte Frisk

Children in Minority Religions - Growing Up in Controversial Religious Groups - Liselotte Frisk

8. Religion, Parenting and Child Corporal Punishment: An Example of the Twelve Tribes

Children in Minority Religions - Growing Up in Controversial Religious Groups - Liselotte Frisk

Liselotte Frisk [+-]
Dalarna University, Sweden
Liselotte Frisk has been a professor in Religious Studies at Dalarna University, Sweden, since 2006. She presented a doctoral dissertation on new religious movements in 1993 at Åbo Akademi, Finland, and after that worked as a lecturer at Umeå University in Sweden for a few years. In 1999 she moved to Dalarna University where she created a profile of studying new religious movements within Religious Studies. Research projects include two projects about New Age in the 1990s, and, later, a 3-year project about what happened to the new religious movements from the 1960s and 70s over the decades, funded by Riksbankens Jubileumsfond. Another research project, undertaken together with Peter Åkerbäck, Stockholm University, dealt with a local mapping of the new spirituality in Dalarna (2008-2011), funded by Vetenskapsrådet. A current research project, also funded by Vetenskapsrådet, deals with children in minority religions (2012-2015). All research projects have resulted in books and articles in Swedish as well as in English. Liselotte Frisk has been co-editor of the International Journal for the Study of New Religions (2010-2013), and is currently co-editor of Aura, a Nordic journal publishing academic articles about new religious movements. She was the director of International Society for the Study of New Religions for four years (2010-2013), and is now the vice director of FINYAR, the Nordic society for the academic study of new religions. Other research interests include new religions in Japan.

Description

Corporal punishment of children is a controversial subject. Many countries in the world have relatively recently legislated against this child-rearing practice. This chapter discusses the practice of corporal punishment in child rearing in historical perspective. This will be discussed from the Swedish perspective, as Sweden was the first country to legislate against the practice and is the country where our interviews about growing up in minority religions were taken. The theoretical perspective introduced by the Norwegian psychologist, Karsten Hundeide, which relates the sociocultural frames concerning child rearing and the concepts “contract” and “metacontract” between child and caretaker, will be used. The Twelve Tribes and their approach to childrearing and parenting, and specifically their practice of discipline ("spanking"), will be described as an example of a religious group defending and practicing these methods. The Twelve Tribes does not exist in Sweden, and the main data for this paper was gathered during field visits to the Twelve Tribes in Klosterzimmern in Germany, in Czech Republic, and in Devon, Great Britain.

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Citation

Frisk, Liselotte. 8. Religion, Parenting and Child Corporal Punishment: An Example of the Twelve Tribes. Children in Minority Religions - Growing Up in Controversial Religious Groups. Equinox eBooks Publishing, United Kingdom. p. 208-230 Feb 2018. ISBN 9781781794203. https://www.equinoxpub.com/home/view-chapter/?id=32375. Date accessed: 16 Dec 2019 doi: 10.1558/equinox.32375. Feb 2018

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