11. "[T]he Thing itself Always Steals Away": Scholars and the Constitution of their Objects of Study

Constructing Data in Religious Studies - Examining the Architecture of the Academy - Leslie Dorrough Smith

Craig Martin [+-]
St. Thomas Aquinas College
Craig Martin, Ph.D., is Professor of Religious Studies at St. Thomas Aquinas College. His work focuses on method and theory in the study of religion, as well as discourse analysis and ideology critique of modern rhetoric on religion. His recent works include Capitalizing Religion: Ideology and the Opiate of the Bourgeoisie and A Critical Introduction to the Study of Religion.

Description

Poststructuralists have long since argued that scholars constitute their objects of study, in part through the use of discourses that construct reality. Critics often argue that this sort of anti-realism entails a fundamental, dualist opposition between reality-as-it-appears-in-discourse and reality-in-itself. According to their critics, poststructuralists imagine themselves locked into a prison house of language, from which reality-in-itself is inaccessible. In this paper I argue that this critique grossly misrepresents poststructuralism, and that more careful attention to poststructuralist, anti-realist arguments is necessary before dismissing them.

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Citation

Martin, Craig. 11. "[T]he Thing itself Always Steals Away": Scholars and the Constitution of their Objects of Study. Constructing Data in Religious Studies - Examining the Architecture of the Academy. Equinox eBooks Publishing, United Kingdom. p. Oct 2019. ISBN 9781781796764. https://www.equinoxpub.com/home/view-chapter/?id=34176. Date accessed: 24 Jun 2019 doi: 10.1558/equinox.34176. Oct 2019

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