The Singing Voice in Contemporary Cinema - Diane Hughes

The Singing Voice in Contemporary Cinema - Diane Hughes

The Singing Voice and its Use to Evoke Unease, Discomfort and Violence

The Singing Voice in Contemporary Cinema - Diane Hughes

Liz Giuffre [+-]
University of Technology, Sydney
Dr Liz Giuffre is a Senior Lecturer in Communication at the University of Technology Sydney. She also regularly works in the national independent arts press as a journalist and commentator, including work as the regular contributing editor for Metro magazine, a regular contributor to Critical Studies in Television, and columnist for The Conversation.
Mark Thorley [+-]
Coventry University
Dr Mark Thorley’s research centres on the creative industries, with particular emphasis on the role of technology. This work draws upon his background as a classically-trained musician, technologist and entrepreneur. His is a past Director of the Music Producers’ Guild in the UK, and a Senior Fellow of the Higher Education Academy.

Description

This chapter explores the potential for the singing voice to evoke unease, discomfort and even violence. It shows how the singing voice, as key to a film performance can become motivator, marker and enabler of dramatic action. Two types of performances are proposed; the use of individual singing voices related to their ability to perform violence; and the use of communal singing with its relationship to competition and power.

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Citation

Giuffre, Liz; Thorley, Mark. The Singing Voice and its Use to Evoke Unease, Discomfort and Violence. The Singing Voice in Contemporary Cinema. Equinox eBooks Publishing, United Kingdom. p. 168-182 Nov 2020. ISBN 9781781791127. https://www.equinoxpub.com/home/view-chapter/?id=35469. Date accessed: 22 Oct 2021 doi: 10.1558/equinox.35469. Nov 2020

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