13. Flamenco for Andalusia, Flamenco for Humanity: Regionalisation and Intangible Cultural Heritage in Spain

Cultural Mapping and Musical Diversity - Britta Sweers

Matthew Machin-Authenrieth [+-]
University of Cambridge
Matthew Machin-Autenrieth is currently a Leverhulme Early Career fellow at the Faculty of Music, University of Cambridge, and research associate at Corpus Christ College and the Woolf Institute. He completed his Ph.D. in ethnomusicology at the School of Music, Cardiff University in 2013 with a thesis concerning the relationship between flamenco and regional identity politics in Andalusia, Spain. This research was published in the monograph Flamenco, Regionalism and Musical Heritage in Southern Spain (Routledge, 2017). His current postdoctoral research explores collaborations between flamenco and North African musicians, framed by wider debates regarding immigration and multiculturalism in Andalusia.

Description

This chapter examines the relationship between flamenco’s declaration as Intangible Cultural Heritage and its development within Andalusia. Flamenco’s UNESCO status has strengthened the Andalusian Government’s own project of ‘regionalisation’ (Schrijver, 2007), where flamenco is promoted as a cultural marker for Andalusia and a ‘gift’ for humanity. This chapter analyses the close link between the UNESCO declaration and regionalist politics. Moreover, it considers points of conflict that have arisen as a result of the declaration, with a particular focus on the flamenco community of Granada. I argue that flamenco’s development as heritage runs the risk of stifling local flamenco diversity at the expense of a unified regional tradition.

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Citation

Machin-Authenrieth, Matthew. 13. Flamenco for Andalusia, Flamenco for Humanity: Regionalisation and Intangible Cultural Heritage in Spain. Cultural Mapping and Musical Diversity. Equinox eBooks Publishing, United Kingdom. Mar 2020. ISBN 9781781797594. https://www.equinoxpub.com/home/view-chapter/?id=35838. Date accessed: 17 Jun 2019 doi: 10.1558/equinox.35838. Mar 2020

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