Archaeology, Politics and Islamicate Cultural Heritage in Europe - David Govantes-Edwards

Archaeology, Politics and Islamicate Cultural Heritage in Europe - David Govantes-Edwards

4. Gendered Pasts: Women in al-Andalus

Archaeology, Politics and Islamicate Cultural Heritage in Europe - David Govantes-Edwards

Nicola Clarke [+-]
Newcastle University
Nicola Clark is a lecturer at Newcastle University (United Kingdom). Her work as a historian focuses on medieval Islamic Iberia (al-Andalus), with particular interests in historiography and social history. Her teaching, however, ranges across the Islamic world, from the time of the Prophet Muhammad down to the early 17th century. HEr primary research focus at present is on representations of gender - particularly masculinity - in legal and literary texts from medieval Islamic Iberia (al-Andalus). She also remains interested in medieval Islamic intellectual life, especially historiography, geography and travel writing in Arabic.
Mikel Herrán [+-]
UCL Qatar
Mikel Herrán sat his undergraduate studies in Archaeology in the Universidad Complutense (Madrid, Spain). He then completed an MA in the Archaeology of the Arab and Islamic World at UCL Qatar with a dissertation on Islamisation and Gender in Al-Andalus. He has worked in several projects involving Archaeology and Museums in the Gulf region and is currently working as a researcher for the project ‘The Transformation of the Moroccan Landscape in the Early Islamic Period’ at UCL Qatar, in collaboration with INSAP (Institut National des Sciences de l'Archéologie et du Patrimoine).

Description

The aim of the present chapter is twofold: to discuss, in archaeological terms, how gender can be performed and enacted in Islamicate societies, and to put the focus on women and their position within these same societies. The study of women in al-Andalus is inlaid with multi-layered signifiers which influence gender performance beyond religion, including ethnicity and coexistence with non-Islamic social groups. In trying to go beyond the image of Muslim women as ‘other’, this chapter will study how hegemonies of femininity were created and encoded, paying special attention to domestic spaces and goods, as well as to the written sources.

Notify A Colleague

Citation

Clarke, Nicola; Herrán, Mikel. 4. Gendered Pasts: Women in al-Andalus. Archaeology, Politics and Islamicate Cultural Heritage in Europe. Equinox eBooks Publishing, United Kingdom. p. Jan 2021. ISBN 9781781797884. https://www.equinoxpub.com/home/view-chapter/?id=36073. Date accessed: 24 Oct 2019 doi: 10.1558/equinox.36073. Jan 2021

Dublin Core Metadata