Harry Finds Fame

Two Bold Singermen and the English Folk Revival - The Lives, Song Traditions and Legacies of Sam Larner and Harry Cox - Bruce Lindsay

Bruce Lindsay [+-]
Music Journalist and Social Historian
Bruce Lindsay has a PhD in history from the University of East Anglia. He is a freelance music journalist and social history researcher writing for All About Jazz and Jazz Journal. In the past he was a semi-professional guitarist and bassist in R&B, soul and jazz bands and was a regular performer at open-mike nights and folk sessions across East Anglia. He is the author of Shellac & Swing: A Social History of the Gramophone in Britain published in 2019.

Description

Commercial folk music recordings began in 1908, when Lincolnshire farm steward Joseph Taylor recorded a dozen songs for the Gramophone Company at its London studio. They were a commercial failure and recording continued for research and study only. A decade after EJ Moeran published the songs he collected from Harry, the farm labourer made his first commercial recordings, travelling to London to record for the English Folk Dance and Song Society (EFDSS) at the Decca studios. In the late 1940s Moeran again recorded him, this time for the BBC and in the company of some of his Norfolk friends and fellow singers. Harry achieved a small degree of fame, but remained in Norfolk, singing for pleasure.

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Citation

Lindsay, Bruce. Harry Finds Fame. Two Bold Singermen and the English Folk Revival - The Lives, Song Traditions and Legacies of Sam Larner and Harry Cox. Equinox eBooks Publishing, United Kingdom. Mar 2021. ISBN 9781781799178. https://www.equinoxpub.com/home/view-chapter/?id=38553. Date accessed: 12 Nov 2019 doi: 10.1558/equinox.38553. Mar 2021

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