The Road Goes on Forever?

Two Bold Singermen and the English Folk Revival - The Lives, Song Traditions and Legacies of Sam Larner and Harry Cox - Bruce Lindsay

Bruce Lindsay [+-]
Music Journalist and Social Historian
Bruce Lindsay has a PhD in history from the University of East Anglia. He is a freelance music journalist and social history researcher writing for All About Jazz and Jazz Journal. In the past he was a semi-professional guitarist and bassist in R&B, soul and jazz bands and was a regular performer at open-mike nights and folk sessions across East Anglia. He is the author of Shellac & Swing: A Social History of the Gramophone in Britain published in 2019.

Description

This chapter tells of Sam and Harry’s final years. Sam Larner remained popular with folk revivalists, but he spent the last few years quietly at home in Winterton before his death in 1965. Harry lived until 1971: often critical of ‘modern’ songs, he would nevertheless join in with one or two pop hits of the time and the advent of portable tape recorders meant that he was regularly visited by fans eager to make their own recordings of this influential singer. Both men are regularly cited as key influences on the second folk revival and on the singers and musicians who emerged in the 1960s and later: this closing chapter appraises the men’s lives and posthumous impact, which has extended as far as Hollywood.

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Citation

Lindsay, Bruce. The Road Goes on Forever?. Two Bold Singermen and the English Folk Revival - The Lives, Song Traditions and Legacies of Sam Larner and Harry Cox. Equinox eBooks Publishing, United Kingdom. Mar 2021. ISBN 9781781799178. https://www.equinoxpub.com/home/view-chapter/?id=38558. Date accessed: 14 Dec 2019 doi: 10.1558/equinox.38558. Mar 2021

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