What does Prosody do in Human Communication?: Speaking and Listening

Prosody in Practice - Non-segmental Phonetics in Typical and Atypical Speech - Joan Rahilly

Joan Rahilly [+-]
Queen's University Belfast
Joan Rahilly is Professor in Linguistics and Phonetics at Queen’s University, Belfast, Northern Ireland. Her research focuses on phonetic and phonological manifestations of speech and language disorders, but she is also pursuing work on literacy acquisition amongst young people in the Northern Irish context.

Description

Here, we examine how speakers and listeners use prosodic cues to convey and understand various types of exchanges: discoursal and conversational, and across a range of sociolinguistic, situational and stylistic contexts. Sample contexts are natural conversation and monologue, news and documentary broadcasts and oral advertising (with data from the sources noted in 4.3. above), with a sidebar look at the representation of prosodic behaviours in printed texts. The chapter also explains the ways in which speakers’ prosody contributes to their identity, whether self- or other-perceived, and how prosodic breakdown in atypical speech affects identity cues.

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Citation

Rahilly, Joan. What does Prosody do in Human Communication?: Speaking and Listening. Prosody in Practice - Non-segmental Phonetics in Typical and Atypical Speech. Equinox eBooks Publishing, United Kingdom. Aug 2022. ISBN 9780000000000. https://www.equinoxpub.com/home/view-chapter/?id=40466. Date accessed: 22 Oct 2020 doi: 10.1558/equinox.40466. Aug 2022

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