Preserving Cultural Heritage in the Digital Age - Sending Out an S.O.S. - Nicola Lercari

Preserving Cultural Heritage in the Digital Age - Sending Out an S.O.S. - Nicola Lercari

CAVEkiosk: Cultural Heritage Visualization and Dissemination

Preserving Cultural Heritage in the Digital Age - Sending Out an S.O.S. - Nicola Lercari

Jürgen P. Schulze [+-]
University of California San Diego
Jürgen P. Schulze, Qualcomm Institute, University of California San Diego.
Glynn Williams [+-]
University of California San Diego
Glynn Williams Qualcomm Institute, University of California San Diego.
Connor Smith [+-]
University of California San Diego
Connor Smith Qualcomm Institute, University of California San Diego.
Philip P. Weber [+-]
University of California San Diego
Philip P. Weber, Qualcomm Institute, University of California San Diego.
Thomas E Levy [+-]
University of California, San Diego
Thomas E. Levy is Distinguished Professor of the Graduate Division, Co-Director of the Center for Cyber-Archaeology and Sustainability at the Qualcomm Institute and inaugural holder of the Norma Kershaw Chair in the Archaeology of Ancient Israel and Neighboring Lands at the University of California, San Diego. With over thirty years of archaeological field experience in Israel and Jordan, Levy’s current research focuses on the Iron Age historical archaeology of Edom in southern Jordan. He is Associate Director of the Center of Interdisciplinary Science for Art, Architecture and Archaeology (CISA3) at UCSD's California Insitute of Telecommunications and Information Technology (Calit2). Levy is editor of Archaeology, Anthropology and Cult: The Sanctuary at Gilat, Israel (Equinox Publishing, 2006) and co-editor, with Thomas Higham, of The Bible and Radiocarbon Dating: Archaeology, Text and Science (Equinox Publishing, 2005). His most recent book, with his wife Alina and the Sthapathy brothers of Swamimalai is Masters of Fire: Hereditary Bronze Casters of South India (German Mining Museum, 2008). Levy is a fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences.

Description

This chapter describes the hardware and software design of the CAVEkiosk--the first large-scale immersive Virtual Reality environment intended for public use--developed at UC San Diego as part of the Catalyst project. It discusses how the authors collaborated to build new CAVEkiosks at four UC campuses linked by the high-speed Pacific Research Platform to share research data and imagery from at-risk sites around the world, specifically Greece, Egypt, Israel, Jordan, and Turkey. The authors present technical concepts in a way that is understandable to the lay reader and the proposed audience for the volume. This contribution provides a solid literature background for topics presented in other chapters. It introduces readers to Virtual Reality (VR) technology, which is now widely used in archaeology and museums to represent sites and artifacts for scholarly and public-facing purposes.

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Citation

Schulze, Jürgen P. ; Williams, Glynn; Smith, Connor; Weber, Philip P.; Levy, Thomas. CAVEkiosk: Cultural Heritage Visualization and Dissemination. Preserving Cultural Heritage in the Digital Age - Sending Out an S.O.S.. Equinox eBooks Publishing, United Kingdom. p. 147-160 Feb 2022. ISBN 9781800501263. https://www.equinoxpub.com/home/view-chapter/?id=42602. Date accessed: 24 Jul 2024 doi: 10.1558/equinox.42602. Feb 2022

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