2. Protecting Our Living Relatives: Environmental Reproductive Justice and Seed Rematriation

Tasting Religion - Graham Harvey

Elizabeth Hoover [+-]
University of California, Berkeley
Elizabeth Hoover is an associate professor in the Department of Environmental Science, Policy and Management at University of California, Berkeley.

Description

For many Native American communities, understandings of family, fertility, and “collective continuance” are closely rooted to the protection, preservation, and revitalization of native seeds.1 Following on generations of eradication and assimilation, during which the fertility of both Native peoples and gardens have come under threat, Native people have utilized or developed a series of movements, including the reproductive justice movement, the environmental justice movement, and the seed rematriation movement, in an effort to protect and reunite Native families, including their seed relatives.

Notify A Colleague

Citation

Hoover, Elizabeth. 2. Protecting Our Living Relatives: Environmental Reproductive Justice and Seed Rematriation. Tasting Religion. Equinox eBooks Publishing, United Kingdom. Feb 2024. ISBN 9781000000000. https://www.equinoxpub.com/home/view-chapter/?id=44085. Date accessed: 08 Dec 2022 doi: 10.1558/equinox.44085. Feb 2024

Dublin Core Metadata