Technology-mediated Crisis Response in Language Studies - Senta Goertler

Technology-mediated Crisis Response in Language Studies - Senta Goertler

13. Predicting Success in Difficult Times: A Latent Class Analysis of World Language - Teachers’ Online Experience During the COVID-19 Pandemic

Technology-mediated Crisis Response in Language Studies - Senta Goertler

Marta Tecedor [+-]
Arizona State University
Marta Tecedor is an assistant professor in Spanish linguistics at Arizona State University. Her primary area of research is computer-assisted language learning. In her current research, she examines how the use of multimedia technologies can be incorporated in the language classroom to promote the development of linguistic, interactional, and intercultural competencies. Her work has appeared in Foreign Language Annals, Hispania, L2 Journal, ReCALL, Computer- Assisted Language Learning, Language Culture and Curriculum, Journal of Pragmatics, and Applied Linguistics.
Inmaculada Gómez Soler [+-]
Dublin City University
Inmaculada Gómez Soler is Assistant Professor at the School of Applied Language and Intercultural Studies at Dublin City University. Her research fits broadly within the discipline of Applied Linguistics and encompasses three main interrelated areas: heritage speaker bilingualism, language teacher development, and language pedagogy. Her recent publications have appeared in Foreign Language Annals, Hispania, Urban Education, and Languages

Description

In chapter 13, Marta Tecedor and Inmaculada Gómez Soler make recommendations for teacher training based on a global survey-based Latent Class Analysis of language educators’ experience during the early days of ERTL. They classified participants into negative, neutral, and positive attitudes toward online education. Teachers with more experience tended to be more negative; teachers who received training during the pandemic tended to have a neutral rather than a negative attitude; and pre-K12 teachers were less positive than those teaching in higher education or language schools. The training that educators received was emergency training, that addressed mostly immediate needs and low-level skills and not the kind of deep understanding and reflection that is needed to change attitudes. As in other chapters (e.g., Gokool and Naidoo), educators reported challenges with motivation and designing engaging learning environments. Implied in Tecedor and Gómez Soler’s study is that a by-product of ERTL was a shift in attitudes and that those attitudes were influenced by pre-pandemic and thereby pre-crisis conditions. This is similar to the observations made by Landry and Hamel in part 2 of the book.

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Citation

Tecedor, Marta; Soler , Inmaculada Gómez . 13. Predicting Success in Difficult Times: A Latent Class Analysis of World Language - Teachers’ Online Experience During the COVID-19 Pandemic. Technology-mediated Crisis Response in Language Studies. Equinox eBooks Publishing, United Kingdom. p. 280-300 Apr 2024. ISBN 9781800504561. https://www.equinoxpub.com/home/view-chapter/?id=45183. Date accessed: 24 Jun 2024 doi: 10.1558/equinox.45183. Apr 2024

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