Reviews

This volume offers biblical scholars a thorough (and accessible) introduction to archaeological methods, answering basic questions about how sites are chosen, what a locus is, and how measurements are taken and why; and also covering more complex issues such as how to date things and how to identify dirt floors. Each of the 56 chapters are clear, readable and concise, offering further reading recommendations for each topic. Later chapters cover thematic types of archaeology, such as gender, funerary, household and landscape, as well as ethical issues such as artefact ownership, museums, looting, and excavation in contested areas. Specialist terms are explained clearly and topics are treated with sufficient depth and detail, whilst keeping the reader interested and engaged. I would highly recommend this book to those about to embark on the use of archaeology in their work as well as for teaching undergraduate classes which implement archaeological methods and/or sources.
Journal for the Study of the Old Testament