Ancient Cookware from the Levant - An Ethnoarchaeological Perspective - Gloria London

Ancient Cookware from the Levant - An Ethnoarchaeological Perspective - Gloria London

8. How to Treat Clay Pots Prior to Use with Food

Ancient Cookware from the Levant - An Ethnoarchaeological Perspective - Gloria London

Gloria London [+-]
Independent Scholar
Gloria London received her Ph.D from the University of Arizona. She is the author of Ancient Cookware from the Levant (2017, Equinox), Traditional Pottery in Cyrpus (1989, Philipp von Zabern), creator of a video Women Potters of Cyprus (2000, Tetraktys), and co-creator of the Museum of Traditional Pottery in Ayios Dimitrios (Marathasa), Cyprus.

Description

Low-fired clay cooking pots have porous walls that absorb minute food particles. To minimize food residue, ethnoarchaeological studies provide details of temporary and more permanent methods to season, pre-treat, or line pots to reduce porosity. The reapplication of organic linings was necessary each time cooking pots were used. Jars with solid linings, such as resin, bitumen or tannin were retreated annually, due to the acids that caused deterioration of seemingly solid surface treatments. Traditional cookware and water containers were well-suited to meet the needs of villagers and townspeople. Other pots, especially water containers, were valued for their ability to sweat. Medieval-era recipes acknowledge the usefulness of old pots with walls saturated with oil proved useful for storing cheese and other foodstuffs.

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Citation

London, Gloria. 8. How to Treat Clay Pots Prior to Use with Food. Ancient Cookware from the Levant - An Ethnoarchaeological Perspective. Equinox eBooks Publishing, United Kingdom. p. 103-110 Aug 2016. ISBN 9781781791998. https://www.equinoxpub.com/home/view-chapter/?id=23848. Date accessed: 19 Jan 2020 doi: 10.1558/equinox.23848. Aug 2016

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