Ancient Cookware from the Levant - An Ethnoarchaeological Perspective - Gloria London

Ancient Cookware from the Levant - An Ethnoarchaeological Perspective - Gloria London

16. Middle and Late Bronze Age Cookware

Ancient Cookware from the Levant - An Ethnoarchaeological Perspective - Gloria London

Gloria London [+-]
Independent Scholar
Gloria London received her Ph.D from the University of Arizona. She is the author of Ancient Cookware from the Levant (2017, Equinox), Traditional Pottery in Cyrpus (1989, Philipp von Zabern), creator of a video Women Potters of Cyprus (2000, Tetraktys), and co-creator of the Museum of Traditional Pottery in Ayios Dimitrios (Marathasa), Cyprus.

Description

Late Bronze Age society could not support potters who made thin vessel walls from carefully prepared clay. Cookware at coastal sites was highly varied and reflected increased international connections. For the first time, carinated cooking pots appeared alongside globular pots. Both types were made in a mould. Egyptian-style “flower pots” and “beer bottles” attest to foreign influence, presence, and impact on local foodways. Decorated baking trays and/or griddles also were made in moulds. The scoop, an intentionally asymmetrical bowl-like form, made its first appearance. Cookware was often made of clay designed to withstand heating. More than one cookware fabric has been identified at individual sites, which is a trend that expanded in subsequent periods. There is little doubt that despite its bulk, cookware was traded – either empty or filled with food.

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Citation

London, Gloria. 16. Middle and Late Bronze Age Cookware. Ancient Cookware from the Levant - An Ethnoarchaeological Perspective. Equinox eBooks Publishing, United Kingdom. p. 195-202 Aug 2016. ISBN 9781781791998. https://www.equinoxpub.com/home/view-chapter/?id=23857. Date accessed: 19 Jan 2020 doi: 10.1558/equinox.23857. Aug 2016

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