Ancient Cookware from the Levant - An Ethnoarchaeological Perspective - Gloria London

Ancient Cookware from the Levant - An Ethnoarchaeological Perspective - Gloria London

17. Iron Age and Persian Era Cookware

Ancient Cookware from the Levant - An Ethnoarchaeological Perspective - Gloria London

Gloria London [+-]
Independent Scholar
Gloria London received her Ph.D from the University of Arizona. She is the author of Ancient Cookware from the Levant (2017, Equinox), Traditional Pottery in Cyrpus (1989, Philipp von Zabern), creator of a video Women Potters of Cyprus (2000, Tetraktys), and co-creator of the Museum of Traditional Pottery in Ayios Dimitrios (Marathasa), Cyprus.

Description

In the Persian era, large shallow mortaria associated with food preparation joined the globular and bag-shaped deep pots as part of the kitchen repertoire. They were traded over long distances via sea routes but did not reach inland sites. In Transjordan, grinding bowls resembling stone mortars were in use. A closed jar or amphora, possibly used to transport fresh fish, may have functioned as a “cooling” container brought from the coast. Scoops, trays, and graters were likely used in other periods but have not been preserved. At Hisban, the shift from calcite to quartz temper for cookware was completed by the Persian era. The same shift for jars, jugs, and other types of pottery followed. It would seem that potters who made cookware led the shift, which was followed by potters who made the rest of the ceramic repertoire.

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Citation

London, Gloria. 17. Iron Age and Persian Era Cookware. Ancient Cookware from the Levant - An Ethnoarchaeological Perspective. Equinox eBooks Publishing, United Kingdom. p. 203-216 Aug 2016. ISBN 9781781791998. https://www.equinoxpub.com/home/view-chapter/?id=23858. Date accessed: 19 Jan 2020 doi: 10.1558/equinox.23858. Aug 2016

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