Ancient Cookware from the Levant - An Ethnoarchaeological Perspective - Gloria London

Ancient Cookware from the Levant - An Ethnoarchaeological Perspective - Gloria London

22. Implications of Ethnoarchaeological Studies for Ancient Cookware

Ancient Cookware from the Levant - An Ethnoarchaeological Perspective - Gloria London

Gloria London [+-]
Independent Scholar
Gloria London received her Ph.D from the University of Arizona. She is the author of Ancient Cookware from the Levant (2017, Equinox), Traditional Pottery in Cyrpus (1989, Philipp von Zabern), creator of a video Women Potters of Cyprus (2000, Tetraktys), and co-creator of the Museum of Traditional Pottery in Ayios Dimitrios (Marathasa), Cyprus.

Description

We started with clay from the earth, followed by the processing, shaping, finishing, and firing of pots before their distribution to consumers, who used them to process, preserve, store, and cook food. The perspective from pot-maker to pot-user shows modifications in all aspects of manufacture: fabric composition, manufacturing technique, vessel shape, surface treatment, and firing, over seven or eight millennia. New manufacturing techniques inspired and required new tempering materials and experimentation, yet old ways did not disappear quickly or vanish entirely – especially not for round-bottomed cookware. Two resilient and practical traditions for handmade pottery that began in the Early Bronze Age, burnishing and calcite temper, eventually acquiesced to wheel-thrown pots and quartz fabrics in the Late Iron Age/Persian Period. Nevertheless, local, traditional limestone-rich fabrics remained part of the repertoire, especially for large vats and basins that were made with coils or slabs. From medieval times onward, potters resorted to the same Bronze Age practices because they provided practical solutions for local clays. All potters in the southern Levant, who built containers with coils, moulds, or slow-moving turntables, confronted the same challenges, regardless of the time period. Rather than a revival of earlier traditions or direct continuity, the persistence of calcite temper in burnished, handmade cookware represents indigenous potters responding to the intrinsic limitations of the local clays with the same ageless solutions.

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Citation

London, Gloria. 22. Implications of Ethnoarchaeological Studies for Ancient Cookware. Ancient Cookware from the Levant - An Ethnoarchaeological Perspective. Equinox eBooks Publishing, United Kingdom. p. 269-275 Aug 2016. ISBN 9781781791998. https://www.equinoxpub.com/home/view-chapter/?id=28047. Date accessed: 21 Nov 2019 doi: 10.1558/equinox.28047. Aug 2016

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