Technology of Early Settlement in Northern Europe - Transmission of Knowledge and Culture (Volume 2) - Kjel Knutsson

Technology of Early Settlement in Northern Europe - Transmission of Knowledge and Culture (Volume 2) - Kjel Knutsson

Axes in Transformation: A Bifocal View of Axe Technology in the Oslo Fjord area, Norway, c. 9200–6000 cal BC

Technology of Early Settlement in Northern Europe - Transmission of Knowledge and Culture (Volume 2) - Kjel Knutsson

Carine Eymundsson [+-]
Oslo University
Carine Eymundsson is a PhD student in archaeology at the Department of Archaeology, Conservation and History, University of Oslo. Her project deals with changes in macro tool technology in Norway at the transition from Early- to Middle Mesolithic (ca. 8300 cal. BC), and it’s relation to an Eastern impulse and/or migration. Prior to her PhD scholarship Eymundsson has worked as a field leader at the Museum of Cultural History and have been in charge of several excavations.
Guro Fossum [+-]
Oslo University
Guro Fossum is a PhD student in archaeology at the Museum of Cultural History, University of Oslo. Her project deals with the 8200 cal. BP cold event and its impact on Mesolithic groups in eastern Norway. She has also been involved in large-scale Stone Age excavations in southeastern Norway.
Anja Mansrud [+-]
Oslo University
Anja Mansrud is employed as a field archaeologist at the Museum of Cultural History, University of Oslo. She is currently finishing her PhD on the Middle Mesolithic of North Eastern Skagerak.
Lucia Koxvold [+-]
Oslo University
Lucia Uchermann Koxvold works as a field archaeologist at the Museum of Cultural History, University of Oslo. Her research interests are related to the Mesolithic with emphasis on technology, refitting and raw material classifications. For the last five years she has been involved in large-scale Stone Age excavation projects in southeastern Norway.
Axel Mjaerum [+-]
Oslo University
Axel Mjærum is a field archeologist and former researcher at the Museum of Cultural History, University of Oslo. His research covers Stone Age archaeology, especially chronological subjects, and hunting and fishing traditions in southeastern Norway.

Description

The first Mesolithic core axes were produced in South Eastern Norway c. 9000 BC. The raw material was flint, and morphologically the axes had a bifacial shape which closely resembles axes from other parts of Northern Europe. 3000 years later core axes were still produced, but they were made of locally available non-flint raw material. Nøstvet axes from the 6th millennium BC were produced with a very different three-sided production strategy. The article discuss the numerous transitions and variations in morphology, technology and raw material of Mesolithic core axes from South Eastern Norway, in the period between c. 9000 – c. 6000 cal. BC. This is based on finds of axes and debitage from axe production at sites in the Oslofjord area. The article also links changes in technology to changes in society, from a highly mobile pioneer culture to a situation with increased sedentism and regionalization.

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Citation

Eymundsson, Carine; Fossum, Guro; Mansrud, Anja; Koxvold, Lucia; Mjaerum, Axel. Axes in Transformation: A Bifocal View of Axe Technology in the Oslo Fjord area, Norway, c. 9200–6000 cal BC. Technology of Early Settlement in Northern Europe - Transmission of Knowledge and Culture (Volume 2). Equinox eBooks Publishing, United Kingdom. p. 201-229 Apr 2018. ISBN 9781781795163. https://www.equinoxpub.com/home/view-chapter/?id=30717. Date accessed: 14 Aug 2020 doi: 10.1558/equinox.30717. Apr 2018

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