Early Economy and Settlement in Northern Europe - Pioneering, Resource Use, Coping with Change - Hans Peter Blankholm

Early Economy and Settlement in Northern Europe - Pioneering, Resource Use, Coping with Change - Hans Peter Blankholm

TTent, Hut or House? A Discussion on Early Mesolithic Dwellings in Light of the Site Mohalsen 2012-II, Vega, Northern Norway

Early Economy and Settlement in Northern Europe - Pioneering, Resource Use, Coping with Change - Hans Peter Blankholm

Silje E. Fretheim [+-]
Norwegian University of Science and Technology (NTNU)
Silje E. Fretheim is a PhD candidate in Archaeology at NTNU, The University Museum, Trondheim. Research interests: Stone Age dwellings and settlement structures, dynamics in the Mesolithic of the Scandinavian Peninsula, comparative studies, interactions between coastal and inland foragers.
Hein B. Bjerck [+-]
Norwegian University of Science and Technology (NTNU)
Hein B. Bjerck is professor in archaeology (research and teaching) at the NTNU University Museum in Trondheim. His research is focussed on early marine foraging (Marine Ventures project), and large scale excavation projects (Ormen Lange project). Bjerck is also involved in research on the recent past, and project member in Ruin Memories, After Discourse and Objects Matter.
Heidi Mjelva Breivik [+-]
Department of Historical Studies, Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Trondheim, Norway.
Heidi Mjelva Breivik holds a PhD in archaeology from the Norwegian University of Science and Technology in Trondheim. Her research focusses Early Stone Age with emphasis on marine foragers, human–environment relations, technology and settlement patterns.
A. Francisco J. Zangrando [+-]
Laboratory of Anthropology CADIC-CONICET
Atilio Francisco Zangrando is a full-time researcher at CADIC-CONICET (Argentina), and part-time lecturer at the University of Buenos Aires. His current research focuses on marine hunter-gatherers in southern South America, and includes coastal archaeology, settlement patterns, zooarchaeology and stable isotopes.

Description

Our research excavation of the site Mohalsen 2012-II on Vega in northern Norway presented us with the remains of a pioneer age dwelling believed to have been in use during the last part of the Early Mesolithic (EM) period, c. 9100 BP (8300 cal. BC). Our review of other excavated Norwegian EM dwellings reveal (with some exceptions) that the observable remains are typically somewhat indistinct, context dependent features; interpretations often involve areas cleared of stones and/or sharply defined lithics concentrations. Their characteristics fit a highly mobile lifestyle pattern and the use of fully portable tents. In contrast, the Mohalsen 2012-II dwelling remains showed a solid structure of 98 cobbles surrounding a distinct fireplace and a form of culture layer, but few artifacts. Our excavation aimed at sorting out the character of this dwelling in order to explore how the distinction between the remains of a tent and a more permanent dwelling might materialize in the archaeological record, and how the site related to the changes in logistics and settlement systems documented at Vega from the Early to the Middle Mesolithic.

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Citation

Fretheim, Silje; Bjerck, Hein; Breivik, Heidi; Zangrando, A. Francisco J. . TTent, Hut or House? A Discussion on Early Mesolithic Dwellings in Light of the Site Mohalsen 2012-II, Vega, Northern Norway. Early Economy and Settlement in Northern Europe - Pioneering, Resource Use, Coping with Change. Equinox eBooks Publishing, United Kingdom. p. 207-230 May 2018. ISBN 9781781795170. https://www.equinoxpub.com/home/view-chapter/?id=30732. Date accessed: 26 Sep 2021 doi: 10.1558/equinox.30732. May 2018

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