Ecology of Early Settlement in Northern Europe - Conditions for Subsistence and Survival (Volume 1) - Per Persson

Ecology of Early Settlement in Northern Europe - Conditions for Subsistence and Survival (Volume 1) - Per Persson

2. Marine and Terrestrial Vertebrate Fauna in Skagerak and Southern Norway in the Late Pleistocene and Early Holocene

Ecology of Early Settlement in Northern Europe - Conditions for Subsistence and Survival (Volume 1) - Per Persson

Leif Jonsson [+-]
The Goteborg Museum of Natural History
Leif Jonsson is an osteologist at The Goteborg Museum of Natural History in Sweden.

Description

The end of the Ice Age and the beginning of the Holocene was very dynamic. The climate fluctuated; new land became available due to melting ice and isostatic land uplift. The vegetation changed rapidly. During a single lifetime great changes could be observed. From the Late Glacial / Holocene transition to the middle of the Preboreal, great changes occurred in the climate, vegetation and fauna both on land and in the sea. Different natural resources became accessible. Today, there are no straight analogies to these Early Holocene ecosystems in southern Scandinavia. The earliest bone finds from a coastal settlement site is from Huseby klev, dated from 8300 to 5700 BC. Changes in the species composition there has been interpreted as result of a "marine mammal collapse". Here it is argued that these differences is due to taphonomy and that the major shift in subsistence strategy did take place before 8300 BC.

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Citation

Jonsson, Leif. 2. Marine and Terrestrial Vertebrate Fauna in Skagerak and Southern Norway in the Late Pleistocene and Early Holocene. Ecology of Early Settlement in Northern Europe - Conditions for Subsistence and Survival (Volume 1). Equinox eBooks Publishing, United Kingdom. p. 19-37 Feb 2018. ISBN 9781781795156. https://www.equinoxpub.com/home/view-chapter/?id=30917. Date accessed: 21 Aug 2019 doi: 10.1558/equinox.30917. Feb 2018

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