Sounds Irish, Acts Global - Explaining the Success of Ireland's Popular Music Industry - Michael Mary Murphy

Sounds Irish, Acts Global - Explaining the Success of Ireland's Popular Music Industry - Michael Mary Murphy

How Teenagers and Students Shaped Culture

Sounds Irish, Acts Global - Explaining the Success of Ireland's Popular Music Industry - Michael Mary Murphy

Michael Mary Murphy [+-]
Dun Laoghaire Institute of Art, Design and Technology, Dublin
Michael Mary Murphy is a lecturer on the music industry at Dun Laoghaire Institute of Art, Design and Technology, Dublin. He worked in the music industry for twenty years as an artist manager as well as an artist and repertoire (A&R) manager in New York and London. He has published a number of articles on the Irish music industry for academic journals and contributes to radio and print media outlets on Irish music industry topics.

Description

Student union entertainment organisers played a key role in the development of Ireland’s music culture and music industry. Most notably, during the 1970s and 1980s, the ‘ents officers’ from Ireland’s universities provided ways for Irish bands and youth culture to develop. This was do-it-yourself (DIY) music activity; most of the student union positions were part-time or short-term. Another important strand of DIY music activity came with Dublin’s Hope collective who arranged not-for-profit gigs for bands including Green Day, Fugazi, Chumbawamba and Babes in Toyland.

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Citation

Murphy, Michael Mary. How Teenagers and Students Shaped Culture. Sounds Irish, Acts Global - Explaining the Success of Ireland's Popular Music Industry. Equinox eBooks Publishing, United Kingdom. p. 90-106 Jul 2023. ISBN 9781781797808. https://www.equinoxpub.com/home/view-chapter/?id=36038. Date accessed: 05 Mar 2024 doi: 10.1558/equinox.36038. Jul 2023

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