Panel C: Pilgrimage- Localities and Global Discourse; Introduction to Panel C

Levantine Entanglements - Cultural Productions, Long-term Changes and Globalizations in the Eastern Mediterranean - Terje Stordalen

Terje Stordalen [+-]
University of Oslo
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Terje Stordalen (Dr. theol. Hebrew Bible/Old Testament studies, MF School of Theology, Oslo, 1998) is a professor of Hebrew Bible/Old Testament studies at the University of Oslo, where he is currently the head of the inter-disciplinary research school ATTR (Authoritative Texts and Their Reception). He also holds a chair as Obel Visiting Social Science professor at Aalborg University, Denmark. Stordalen has conducted and headed extensive cross-disciplinary research, particularly as head of the former research network “Religion in Pluralist Societies” (University of Oslo). He was the leader of the LDG research group situated at the Centre for Advanced Study, Norwegian Academy of Science and Letters in 2014–2015. He has also taken part in excavations at Tall Hisban, Jordan.

Description

Panel C, like Panel B, explores potential roles of religious ideology in early instances of globalizations, now focusing upon the religious ideology and practice of pilgrimage. As in Panel B, the focus is upon the interaction of local and trans-local/imperial interests and forces in these practices. In chapter 11, church historian Øyvind Norderval explores the genesis of the cultural paradigm of religious pilgrimage, charting the interaction of the imperial and local elites in the construction of the Holy Land. Chapter 12 is written by the historian of ideas, Christine Amadou, focusing specifically upon the cult of St. George in the Levantine city of Lydda, examining the interaction between local ownership and imperial ideology throughout the ages. In chapter 13, social anthropologist Jens Kreinath pursues these entanglements as they occur in present-day Antakya, the northernmost corner of the Levant. Taken together, these studies elucidate how players in l’histoire evénémentielle (represented by imperial initiatives and forces as well as by bishops and other trans-local authorities) interacted with the dynamics of l'histoire conjoncturelle (represented by local elites representing their home communities). It was the co-culminations of these very differently paced registers, and their eventual co-working in specific media and forms that made possible the idea and practice of a pilgrimage to the Holy Land—an idea and practice later taken over by Islam, and then by Zionism, and today exerting considerable influence both in religious communities and in world geo-politics.

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Citation

Stordalen, Terje. Panel C: Pilgrimage- Localities and Global Discourse; Introduction to Panel C. Levantine Entanglements - Cultural Productions, Long-term Changes and Globalizations in the Eastern Mediterranean. Equinox eBooks Publishing, United Kingdom. p. Jan 2021. ISBN 9781781799123. https://www.equinoxpub.com/home/view-chapter/?id=38451. Date accessed: 10 Aug 2020 doi: 10.1558/equinox.38451. Jan 2021

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